Radial Arm Saw not cutting well

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The negative hook angle for radial arm saws is primarily for safety, to diminish the propensity to climb that RAS exhibit.
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Rake angles for radial arm saw blade are negative. Try that same negative rake blade for cutting MDF on a tablesaw. Works great for that. Does not do so well on real wood though.

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Possibly.
Huh?? HP rating dictates that. You have to compare apples to apples. You could just as easily say that a TS is generally less powerful than a RAS.

Not likely. If buying a common TS blade and using on a RAS the results may be the same as described by the OP.
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Leon wrote:

You could say that, but it wouldn't be true.

Likely. I have never bought a blade specifically for my radial arm saw, in fact, I doubt that they even made special blades when I bought my RAS. I never saw a Wards or Sears blade that said it was for a RAS. I have always used the same blades on my radial arm saw and table saw.
Using a table saw blade on a RAS does not result in what the OP described.
Not to put a fine point on it, but since most people here hate RAS and don't have them, where do people come up with all this nonsense about RAS?
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Suanne Lippman wrote:

Got a point. Maybe he does have the blade on backwards. Only two possibilities, the (1) blade -- dull, on backwards, or something, or (2) the motor-- burned winding, bad contacts, etc. But we already know there something wrong with the motor since it starts slow and takes a while to speed up.
Something is seriously wrong if he can't cut 3/4" wood rapidly.
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RogWin54 wrote:

It -might- be your motor, but electric motors are usually go/no-go. Does it make horrible squealing noises, like say, a bad bearing?
Make sure the plug and all electrical connections are good. If the motor gets really hot, you may have a short inside. You may want to take the motor apart if you're knowledgable about doing that, or take it to an electric motor shop. It'll still be cheaper than a new saw.
Check the voltage, as someone else has mentioned. It should be stamped on the motor. If it's switchable, make sure it's wired for the voltage you've plugged it into. Also, make sure the motor is rated for 60 Hz (or whatever your local frequency is), and it's not some funky import or custom saw.
You can go to owwm.com to see if they have the manual for your saw there on line. You could've also posted the model here, as others may have one like yours.
--
Michael White "To protect people from the effects of folly is to
fill the world with fools." -Herbert Spencer
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This could also be caused by using an extension cord that is not rated for the current. I have an air compressor that will only run right if plugged in directly, or with a 15A extension cord. El cheapo cords won't cut it.

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Yah, could be except sounds like the father-in-law had the same problem. Maybe cord to motor has broken strands, switch could be bad, are bearings binding? either of these should cause the reset button on the motor to trip. I have a 30+ year old Craftsman RAS that cuts fine only problem is watching that it doesn't pull its' self into the work too fast and stall on heavy stuff, especially Oak. Was going to say it is on a 15 amp circuit but I believe it is now on a 20 amp.
Walt Conner
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This could also be caused by using an extension cord that is not rated for the current. I have an air compressor that will only run right if plugged in directly, or with a 15A extension cord. El cheapo cords won't cut it.

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This could also be caused by using an extension cord that is not rated for the current. I have an air compressor that will only run right if plugged in directly, or with a 15A extension cord. El cheapo cords won't cut it.

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Yeah, it's like you gotta cut 3 times before it works.
<grins>
-Zz
wrote:

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I would surmise that this could be a bad motor starting capacitor.
Marv

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how old is the saw? i got a 1954 dewalt (amf years) for 50 bucks, thought i had a great deal. as it turns out motors peter out over time - sitting idle for years doesn't help. I found a guy in iowa who would recondition it for somewhere around a grand including shipping. hell of a deal. buy a new saw
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how old is the saw? i got a 1954 dewalt (amf years) for 50 bucks, thought i had a great deal. as it turns out motors peter out over time - sitting idle for years doesn't help. I found a guy in iowa who would recondition it for somewhere around a grand including shipping. hell of a deal. buy a new saw
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It could be that you are running it on an excessively long 14 gauge wire from your electric panel - The saw requires about 12 amps running, but can draw about 20 on start-up. On a long wire it's resistance could rob you of the power that you need. Try to connect it to a heavy extension cord plugged into an outlet close to your electric panel or measure the voltage at the saw with it running - if not at least 90 volts (on a 120 circuit) you have a problem.
It could be that the blade is slipping - check the flatness of the washers on both sides of the blade and reverse the surfaces that touch the blade. I once had a saw with a cupped washer and if I didn't get it on right the blade would slip.
It could be that you have the blade on backwards - This sounds like a dumb suggestion, but I've now fixed 2 radial arm saws by turning the blade over. They cut a lot better afterwards. One was owned by a neighbor and the other by a guy that I worked with.
It could be that one of the capacitors in your motor is bad - some saws have both a start capacitor and a run capacitor. They're hard to test and not very expensive. Whenever I suspect that I have a bad one, I replace it. Your local electric motor shop can help with the replacement, testing, etc.
--
Charley

"RogWin54" < snipped-for-privacy@spam.invalid> wrote in message
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On Wed, 08 Feb 2006 00:00:42 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@spam.invalid (RogWin54) wrote:
Lets keep it simple... is the blade installed with the teeth in the correct direction...
I'm one of many people that have admitted this mistake... it's backwards from most saws so pay close attention to the arrows on the blade... The teeth on the bottom of the blade as you're making your cut should be facing away from you, towards the fence..

Mac https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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On Wed, 08 Feb 2006 00:00:42 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@spam.invalid (RogWin54) wrote:

remembering my problems when I bought a used RAS... belt could also be bad or loose... little sucker that didn't LOOK adjustable but was.. *g*
Mac https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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snipped-for-privacy@splinters.comcast.net wrote:

Belt?? That's a new one on me... never saw a RAS that had the blade mounted any way other than directly on the motor shaft...
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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I have seen one (1) RAS with a belt, can't remember the brand now it was some foreign make though. The motor was offset from the blade arbor about 1 1/2 inch or so. ( take a look at an old Milwaukee miter saw) It seemed like a good idea to me, allowed you to change motors with out having to buy a special set up and should have been cheaper to make, standard motor instead of custom set up.
wrote:

bad or

mounted
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On Thu, 09 Feb 2006 14:39:28 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Yep.. surprised the hell out of me, too... When I got my Monkey Wards Power Kraft at a garage sale, I put a new blade on it an it cut ok, but really has the feel of a belt slipping... It couldn't be, of course, because I'd never seen a RSAS with a belt, either, so I didn't check that.. *lol*
Then I noticed that the center of the blade was about 3 inches below the center of the motor and dropped the end panel.. sure as hell, a little belt about 3/8" by maybe 8"... lol Loosened the bolts, dropped the blade down a bit and it was good to go.. Mac https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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