Radial Arm Saw adjustment question - was Wisdom needed

I've started over from scratch setting up my table with the manual in hand.
All goes fine until I try to check column-to-column support adjustment.
With the arm indexed at 0 degrees and locked, the end of the arm can be lifted about 3/8 inch, and you can see the column shift within the column support.
It does NOT shift side-to-side and it is NOT shifting at the arm-to-column attachment point. Elevation resistance is normal.
To help visualize it, it's as if there's a missing lower stabilizing ring on the column, allowing the bottom of the column to shift front-to-back inside the the column support when the end of the arm is lifted by hand.
Is some vertical play normal? How much do you have?
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wild snipped-for-privacy@swamprabbit.com.invalid wrote:

the column, allowing the bottom of the column to shift front-to-back inside the the column support when the end of the arm is lifted by hand.

any radial arm saw, otherwise the depth of a cut could vary on a cross cut. With my arm unlocked there is very little play and with it locked there is no play. Well if you lifted hard enough you could bend the arm, but that would be stupid.
It sounds like something is worn out or has shifted. Probably the only thing you can do is take it apart and look.
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Should be no vertical play other than the very slight slack in the adjustment screw. 3/8 is way too much.
Do you have the Jon Eakes book? If so check page 43.
If this is a Craftsman, there should be 6 bolts going side-to-side at the back of the casting. Two of them may be a different color--try taking up on those. If they're all the same color then try the top one and not the one immediately below it but the one below that (if the bolts are numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 starting from the top it would be "1" and "3" that you're adjusting).
Also, in a good light inspect that casting for cracks.
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I thought I had tried every permutation, but I guess I'd missed one.
I tightened the #3 bolt ONLY about 1 flat and it was perfect. I think I'd been snugging #1 and #3 equally as I went along. It's solid both ways, locked and unlocked. It's a little stiffer (ugh) to crank, but now I can move on with the set -up.
Thank you for the replies.
(I'm looking forward to recieving the book - just couldn't wait to start)
On Fri, 27 Oct 2006 07:44:31 -0400, "J. Clarke"

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