Rack construction ideas????

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On Friday, March 22, 2013 5:31:15 AM UTC-6, dadiOH wrote:

1/4" pipe? LOL. I'll certainly give your suggestion some consideration.
Since my replying, I've thought: The guy I got the rollers from may have moved all that "scrap stuff", he had near his barn, to a back field. The guy collected lots of discorded/broken stuff, to the chagrin of his wife (a nd others), and he isn't one to readily get rid of "good" scrap, so there m ay be rollers still available. I think I'll give him a visit. If any are available, a few beers should do it... and a sitting through his tome of st ories.
Sonny
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On 3/21/2013 9:15 AM, Leon wrote:

IME and observation (not scientific either ;) ), storing any lumber flat gives the seller a better chance that, if and when it bows, it does so after the customer has paid for it.
Storing hardwoods vertically, and without pressure from above and below causing it to (temporarily?) stay flat, gives the customer a better chance of choosing a board that will stay that way. :)
AAMOF, experienced that exact scenario Tuesday at Clark's when buying walnut.
Clarks, unlike Hardwood Products, only stores their S2S1E hardwoods vertically. The rest, including all dimensioned, seems to be uniformly stored horizontally.
(I'll be heading back to Clarks within the hour to check over their "shop plywood" bin ... don't need $125 worth of 3/4" walnut ply and hoping they have a piece that will fit the bill.)
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On 3/21/2013 10:29 AM, Swingman wrote:

Valid point. Perhaps we should make an arrangement such that we not pay for wood/lumber until after it has been used in a project, to prevent it from bowing before we pay for it. :~)

My assumption was that the weight of the board would set the bow but I will say that when I find the flat ones that are stored vertically that they stay that way.

Probably too late now, I think resawing some of that Arkansas post material and gluing up for a top for the table would be cool, voids, checks, cracks and all. Fill the voids with black epoxy.
But considering for whom you are building this, it might not be quite perfect enough. ;~)
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On 3/21/2013 11:40 AM, Leon wrote:

Until such time, caveat emptor ... :)

Bingo!
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I have Sheet steel that weigh several hundred pounds a sheet. They bow and their 3/8 or 1/2" thick!
Gravity is a killer.
Have a double width stack or better yet - have a roll up cart that you can slide sheets onto it, take the one you want and move them back on the stack. Store the cart by the other goods.
Martin
On 3/21/2013 9:15 AM, Leon wrote:

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dpb wrote:

Kinda depends on how much weight you intend to put on it, no?
You mentioned pipe. When I was living in Mexico all the water heaters sat on 3/4" galvanized pipes embedded (horizontally) in the masonry walls. _________________
For my own rack...
My problem was that the lumber rack was to be on a concrete block wall which would have required a lot of PITA drilling if I depended on the CB wall for support. I didn't. Instead...
1. 5 - 2x4 uprights, floor to ceiling length
2. Uprights hooked together on edge at 24" interval by two pieces of 3/4" ply about 5-6 inches wide set into the uprights at about 18-24" from top and bottom of uprights.
3. Hooked together uprights were attached to wall with screws through the ply into the furring strips under the drywall.
4. Arms are 21" 2x4s lapped on each side with pieces of 3/4" ply; the ply pieces are longer than the 2x4 so the ply fully overlaps the uprights and are attached to them with 2 - 1/4" bolts. Each upright has four arms.
Now, that isn't going to hold up much weight before the screws pull out of the furring strips so...
5. I made a plinth of PT 2x4s that is butted against the uprights and Tapconed to the floor. It has a piece of 1/4 ply on top so that sawdust doesn't accumulate inside.
That helps hold the rack up but not all that much. What really holds it up is...
6. A 2x4 across the front of the uprights at the ceiling and lagged to each truss.
The top set of arms was positioned so that long pieces lumber could extend over the top of a door. They can extend to the other side too. I could get 16' lengths on the arms but there would be a 4' overhang on each end...too much except to get something out of the way temporarily.
At the moment I have about 1500 pounds of lumber on it, steady as a rock.
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On 3/20/2013 12:28 PM, dadiOH wrote: ...

I did something very similar to that (using header in joists/trusses to take the lateral load) in the garage in the house in TN. I did the same w/ the arms except I made sizable gussets that took up a sizable amount of storage height 'cuz I wasn't confident of the load support of just the same or only slightly wider than the tubafor arms. How much do you think that arm will support comfortably, any idea?
Also in the Swing response I estimated the current onhand stock at something like 1200 bft of rough stock w/o accounting for the miscellaneous at all...so that's roughly 100 cu-ft at (say) 45 lb/cu-ft or call it 5000 lb. I'd guess all in all there's half-again that much more "stuff" of various types, sizes, species scattered around that would eventually like to get located out of the various places it's stacked/piled/tossed...
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dpb wrote:

Well, I can hang from one without any difficulty and I weigh <sob> 220. I wouldn't have any qualms about putting 500# on one. Especially with the weight distributed along the length of the arm. I have four arms along each "row" so that would be what? around 400 bf? I've never had that much on one row though so I can't say for sure.
Basically, there would have to be enough weight on the arm for it to rip the 1/4" bolts through 1 1/2" of plywood.
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dadiOH wrote:

As an added thought, the weight bearing of the arms would be increased greatly if one were to screw small, plywood "thrust blocks" to the uprights just above and below where the plywood on each arm laps the upright.
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On 3/21/2013 7:08 AM, dadiOH wrote:

Making the plywood solid piece w/ a gusset in the corner is the strongest, of course, in resisting the moment arm torque. The pure vertical load isn't much difficulty in resisting; it's the bending moment that's harder.
I had just made them so large before out of uncertainty they were a pita. One could, of course, try to do some calculating... :)
But, I went back to the scrap iron pile yesterday and dug a little more -- looks like I've got enough pieces of various angle of at least 2x2 to make two levels long enough to have roughly 2-ft on both sides of the one column--think that's what I'll do--just lag them into the columns. If'en the spacing between bolt locations isn't enough to have enough torque resistance I can add a gusset plate as needed...
Appreciate everybody's input...I'll try to post some pictures of the old barn redo here at some point...I didn't have a camera w/ a USB connection at the time we did the major restoration work so it was a pita to do then...
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RE: Subject
This will get you to WoodSmithShop.
http://tinyurl.com/c62or3
Search for "Lumber Rack" which will give you some ideas to think about.
Lew
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