Rabbeting bit

I need to buy a new rabbeting bit. I've been using a Freud for quite a while and it has seen better days. I never much liked it, truth be told, because it has a slight up cut and tends to fuzz the top edge. The best thing about it is that it has a bunch of bearings so depth of cut can be varied; handy, but I could live without that ability.
What I want is a bit that has a 3/8 or better cutter height and makes great 3/8 wide rabbets. No up shear, straight or down shear.
So what's your favorite? And why?
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dadiOH
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dadiOH wrote:

Meant to say, "No up shear, straight or down shear OK".

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dadiOH
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My favorite is my CMT Grand Rabbeting bit set that comes in an orange case. It's got a slight up-shear, but I haven't had any trouble with it tearing out the top at all. If fuzzing is a concern, couldn't you just sand it off after cutting your rabbet?
JP
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Mark Whittingham wrote:

Yes. Cut it off, actually, with a knife or chisel. That's what I want to avoid.
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dadiOH
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On Thu, 1 Apr 2010 15:08:25 -0500, the infamous "dadiOH"

Fave: 1/2" straight bit, hanging over the end of the board. Why: Because I own one.
I have about 20 bits and use the 1/2" straight most often, followed by the laminate trim bit, and then the plunge sink-cutout bit. I still haven't used the nifty lock miter bit I bought, or the rail and stile set.
-- It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change. -- Charles Darwin
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scrawled the following:

I used the lock miter bit once. After a lot of test cuts, I did get it to work on one project. Can't quite recall what the project was but I remember every hour I spent sneaking up on the right settings. It's gathering dust somewhere. Unless wife gave it to one of the kids or the Goodwill. Stuff I don't use for a year or two tends to disappear ...
Me: "Nice radio, Dan, I've got one just like it." Wife: "No you don't."
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"dadiOH" wrote:

------------------------------------------- Had a CMT rabbeting bit set, but not the big router to swing it.
Had a Freud Dado set for the T/S.
Did a great job and was a lot faster than a router.
YMMV
Lew
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On Thu, 1 Apr 2010 22:34:29 -0700, the infamous "LDosser"

If I had a spouse who skulked into my shop and tossed tools, she'd be an EX in a real hurry, with brilliant red hand marks on her bum.
-- It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change. -- Charles Darwin
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scrawled the following:

With half inch of dust on it, it might as well be gone.
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On Fri, 2 Apr 2010 21:33:37 -0700, the infamous "LDosser"

Ain't no way my woman's but would ever sit idle long enough for that much dust to settle on it. Ain't no way!
But if it did, she'd be long gone.
-- It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change. -- Charles Darwin
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wrote in message

This is the Shop. I don't have one of the Festering Vacuum Systems, so dust can build in a hurry ...
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On Sat, 3 Apr 2010 17:04:52 -0700, the infamous "LDosser"

Hey, who stole the second T from her butt?

Hmm, I've never tried doin' it in the shop. Nah, too many dangerous, sharp, and pointy things + absolutely -no- place to lay 'er down.
Ever do it in a VW bug? Tilt the front seats forward and put your feet underneath, she's in the back seat with her ankles in the handy, provided ankle straps, and go for it. But that was when we were young pups. I wouldn't try that today, with these knees...
-- It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change. -- Charles Darwin
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<firesign> "Git in that barrel, darlin' and we'll do it 'urricane style!" </firesign>
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wrote in message

Ah, that'd be you ...
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On Sun, 4 Apr 2010 18:16:29 -0700, the infamous "LDosser"

No, I put the teeth marks there.
-- In order that people may be happy in their work, these three things are needed: They must be fit for it. They must not do too much of it. And they must have a sense of success in it. -- John Ruskin, Pre-Raphaelitism, 1850
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wrote in message

I wondered about that ...
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I thought it was a great idea; the lock miter. Setup is so particular that it isn't easy to do progressive cuts so you have to hog it all off on one pass. I pre beveled a bunch of beautiful QS White Oak with some of the best figure I have seen to make 4 ft tall by 4" square posts for a craftsman bed for a client. That lessened the hogging factor. My client wanted 4 sided figure so I built hollow boxes with blocking where I had M&T joints. The bit was grabbing now and then and unbeknownst (sp?) to me, it was slipping in the collet. Ruined the whole bunch, had to buy and mill new stock, not nearly as nice.
Second time I bevel ripped the pieces and then cut 1/8 grooves on the TS with a full kerf blade (about the only reason I keep one) the whole length and used splines. Threw away the lock miter bit and have used splines to build column boxes ever since.
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On 04/02/2010 10:48 AM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

I've heard this claim about lock miter bits many times, and I don't understand what makes people think you have to hog off the entire amount in one pass; it ain't true. I posted a detailed dissertation about my method of setting up and using a lock miter bit a few months ago; I guess I'll have to go dig that up...
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Sure, I do that too. However, the advantage of a rabbeting bit is that it *always* cuts the same width rabbet, no measuring, no set up. Handy when you need the same depth of cut on multiple things when they are cut at different times.
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dadiOH
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