Rabbet drawer fronts?

I am making a dresser and this weekend I will be making drawers. Should I make rabbeted dovetails or non rabbeted (rabbeted left and right on drawer front with dovetails)? Why do a lot of furniture manufactures use rabbeted dovetails?
What do you do most often?
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I should ad that I am referring to flush fitting drawer fronts.
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Generally, flush fitting drawer fronts do not allow for the use of a rabbeted front.
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Leon wrote:

Sure they do.
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dadiOH
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Can you explain?
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For example, if you're using drawer slides, there's a 1/2" gap beside each drawer. You can use a rabbeted dovetail to allow the front to extend past the slides and hide them.
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writes:

Yeah, I see that now, thanks. I usually do not associate slides with regular furniture so much as built in cabinets.
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Or a planted drawer front, simpler.
Peter
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Leon wrote:

Many/most dovetail kits (eg, Porter-Cable) allow for dovetails in a rabbet...the cuts don't go all the way through to the front, sockets/pins are rounded on inboard side. Think "half-blind"...
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Thanks, I have made many rabbeted front DT's with my Leigh. I do not put slides on the sides of drawers on "furniture". Typically I build the drawer to closely fit the hole that it goes into and need no slides. Once upon a time I did make wooden slides but found that if I use hard wood for the drawer sides and a hardwood runner/web frame for them to slide on and then a touch of silicone "after" finishing, the drawer glides. If I am building flush fitting I use through or half blind, if I am wanting to hide the gap I use rabbeted DT's.
Until DJ indicated that the rabbet would hide a slide on the side I could not see a reason to use a rabbet on a flush fit drawer. Learn something new every day.
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Rabbeted would hide the gaps between the drawer and the carcus. Do you want to hide the gap?
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Stoutman wrote:

Possibly so the pins don't show from the front. More likely because equipment ans ease.
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wrote:

A rabbeted front can be used to hide slides in a flush mount drawer. Usually, a rabbeted front is used to create an overlay to hide the gap, as Leon is thinking.
By "slides", I'm thinking of wooden devices, but occasionally you'll see metal cabinet-style slides in furniture.
--------------------------------------------- ** http://www.bburke.com/woodworking.html ** ---------------------------------------------
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"B A R R Y" wrote in message

http://www.e-woodshop.net/Projects3.htm
...and scroll down toward the bottom of "A few wooden drawer details", where you will see some drawers in an old sideboard that have stood the test of time.
One ot the interesting thing about these 100 year old, flush mounted, wooden slide drawers is that the drawer front used a "rabbeted locking rabbet" joint to attach to the front to the sides, while the drawer back was dovetailed to the sides ... an interesting switch.
These drawers are the smoothest working drawers I've ever seen on a piece of furniture, bar none ... and that includes modern drawer slides of all types!
So much so that I arranged a photo session with the curators just to keep this particular method of wooden drawer slides fresh in my mind and hopefully provide some ideas for future drawer makers.
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I use blind dovetails in the front and dovetails on the back. It is easier to make a drawer with a lip than flush mount (and still look good). I have a dovetail jig, but I enjoy cutting them by hand.
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Just finished 4 lipped drawers today for a desk .The drawers are rabbited at the top and sides only so that a 1/4" lip is formed and the drawer edged with a 1/4" quarter round. The sides are attached with conventional dovetails.
The desk is in curly maple which is difficult to grain match.So I had to slice a figured board into 1/4" thick veneers and glue up the drawer fronts to get something looking decent ..........mjh

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