Qx on Gara-Shop Floor Finish


Considering putting something on the concrete floor of the double car garage that serves as my shop on weekends. My main intent is to lighten up the gray concrete to increase the perceived light level (old eyes like lots of light). I've repainted the ceiling, that helped, now considering the floor.
The floor is smooth concrete, a couple of minor surface cracks, but otherwise pretty clean. Looking at either a vinyl covering (lay out like a carpet) or one of the exp oxy finishes. Obviously, non-slip is a prime concern. Table sawing on ice skates does not sound like a repeatable endeavor.
Has anyone done this? Any thoughts/product names appreciated.
Regards.
Tom
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Tom Banes wrote:

What color or your walls? concrete is already reasonably light in color in it's natural state.
Dave
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Probably wants something with a "sheen" on it to reflect light back up. It can definately help to brighten a room.
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Walls are putatively white but mostly covered with cabinets (natural ply with a 20 year patina) and "hanging things" of most any color you can name. In other words, minimal reflection from walls, but not much option.

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I'm going to do the epoxy stuff in a month or so when things warm up. I'd go for more light, as a first step. Those "shop" flourescent lights throw lots of light, and are not expensive.
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Tom Banes wrote:

Tom
Shiny equals slippery and the floor is not where you want the light. (Except when hunting for that dropped screw) I'd recommend that you spend the money on improved lighting. Fred
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hi tom I have had epoxy on the floor in my shop for three years, there is a vast color selection form light to dark. if you put the small chips on the surface then its none slip and makes clean up easier(soothes out the concrete)and depending on the color it will ether lighten or darken the shop. Now my shop is 22x24 and has six banks of florescent lites and two spots and two floods. the floor is light tan and the walls are white. the room is plenty bright for me . If you do the epoxy, cleaning the floor is key to the job
Len
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This is the part that is stopping me from using epoxy on my shop floor. All the directions I've found insist on using muriatic acid to prep the concrete. I can't figure out how to do this in my basement or shop, neither of which have floor drains for rinsing the acid off the floor. I've also read that fumes from the acid tend to cause instant rust on any steel or iron in the vicinity. Can somebody tell me I'm making a mountain out of a molehill here? Is there a way to deal with this?
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I put Rustoleum EpoxyShield on my garage floor. Been there five years and still wearing well. They include a citric acid based cleaner and etcher in the kit. It is non corrosive. Of course, I hosed out the garage to clean it up. I would think that you could hose/squeegee this stuff off your basement floor and clean it up with a mop and bucket... As mentioned in another post, a clean floor is essential for the epoxy to stick. You can buy a can of stuff at Lowes to add to the paint to provide a grippy surface and limit the slip factor. I did not do this (didn't know about it) and regret it - the floor is slippery when wet. I plan to put another coat down this year with the anti-slip stuff.
wrote:

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Larry,
Just mop well it worked for me.(used a rental and changed water a few times)
len
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I also am wanting to coat my shop floor. My circumstances are a little different. Poured slab 6 years ago. The shop shell is now built. "Currently" doing the wiring. The slab was exposed to the weather all that time so it has a non-smooth texture to it. Has anyone used the Rustoleum product on a slab like that. Any suggestions appreciated . . .
Steve
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You can rent a machine that has some grinding stones that will smooth the concrete somewhat. I think it cost me around $50 to rent plus the cost of the stones that I had to buy.
I don't have any idea how much this thing can take off. My floor just had a few ridges here and there because the builder didn't have the concrete guys make the floor real level. The assumption is the floor will just be covered up so it doesn't matter.
Brian Elfert
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