Quiet, lightweight upholstery electric staple gun

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Lee Michaels wrote:

How much do spare tanks weigh? I don't have a car so I'd have to carry the tank four blocks to the nearest gas station and then back home. I have a bad back. Just today I had a chiropractic adjustment. I was in a car accident 15 years ago, which has necessitated 200 medical appointments and my back has been in constant pain for the last 15 years.
How does the whole thing work? You carry the tank to a gas station, fill the tank there, bring it home and hook up the gun to the tank and bypass the compressor? So I wouldn't need a compressor?
I might stretch a canvas every couple of days if they sell well. Some of them could be as long as six feet and as wide as a foot and-a-half. A 40-inch-long by 18-inch-high canvas requires about a hundred staples, so that would mean firing 300 or 400 staples per week.
Robert
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It will weigh about 12 pounds or so for a 5 gallon tank. Cost about $60. Rather than carry it that distance, I'd buy a small compressor and let the tank fill during the day when your neighbors would not be bothered by it.
Two solutions. Buy a pancake compressor with a large enough tank to hold you, or buy a smaller compressor and an auxiliary tank to use (Amazon.com product link shortened)
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"Robert Montgomery" wrote

weigh about 15 - 20 lbs. I have seen them on sale for $20 or so. I would guess about $30 - $40 usd.

Then get a cart ot hand truck of some kind. Strap it in with some kind of web strapping. Take your little baby for a walk. Get it filled up. Bring it home and burp it. Make some art. Life is good.

compressor or a tank. The compressor actually does not drive the gun. The compressor just fills the tank which drives the gun.
That is why when you have a small compressor and use a tool that uses a lot of air, the compressor runs all the time or can not keep up. Conversely, if you use a tool that does not use much air, the compressor comes on rarely.
That is why a tank may work for you. A stapler does not use that much air.

tank, you will just need to try it out. If you get a tank from a place that will take it back, you can always buy a tank and try it out. If it doesn't work, just bring it back.
But it is a tank or a compressor. With one, you have to build a special box for it. With the other, you have to go on air runs. Each has it problems. You have to decide what is best for you.
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Shipping weight on this one is 18 lbs: http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200319119_200319119
Take a pound or two off for packaging, and it's probably pretty close. (It happened to be the first one I found.)

Exactly. The gas station is providing the compressor. Just make sure the tank has a tire-style valve on it.

At 300-400 staples a week, I'd definately look in to getting a small compressor. The small ones often don't make much noise (no worse than a vacuum) and will run just about any air nailer you care to throw at it. (The size you're likely to use will probably shoot 20-30 staples before cycling.)
I have a 5 gallon tank I use for my air brush. It lets me have several minutes of run time before I have to take it back over to the compressor and fill it up. It can be a hassle to take it to a gas station and fill it if you have to every day.
If you start with the tank and find you need more air reserve, you can hook the tank to the compressor and have more standby air. (More time between cycles, but longer cycles.)
Puckdropper
--
Never teach your apprentice everything you know.

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Puckdropper wrote:

Thanks, Puckdropper.
I'm curious to know why your compressor alone wouldn't have enough air to power your airbrush. I airbrushed about 20 years ago, using a little Badger compressor and there was no cycling; I was able to work uninterrupted because there was no loss of air pressure from the compressor. There was a constant, quiet purr from the motor as long as the compressor was plugged into an outlet. Maybe you're using a big, more powerful airbrush that requires more air?
It can be a hassle to take it to a gas station and fill

I agree. I think I'd rather buy a compressor and try to get a box made for it, cover the inside with carpet scraps as suggested and station the boxed compressor my balcony. (As long as the hose would be at least 15 feet long, because that's how far the hose would have to stretch to reach my stapling workstation.)
Robert
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On 3/27/10 11:48 AM, Robert Montgomery wrote:

slinky type hoses, I know mine did. FWIW mine is a 6.5 gallon Bostitch kit that came with a brad nailer & staple gun. Used that POS hose once, replaced it with a 25` Paslode hose and have never looked back.
--
Froz...


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The air compressor does a fine job running the air brush, but it's usually in the garage close to the nailers rather than out in the back building near the air brush.

A 25' coil hose costs about $10 [US] from Lowes, so even if your compressor comes with a short hose you can simply purchase the one you want. Almost everything uses the 1/4" connectors (except the really big stuff), so there's a good chance if you buy something it'll fit.
Puckdropper
--
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On 3/27/10 2:59 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

I always felt it was pulling back on me, so just went with a 25 foot straight hose, I coil it up and put it on a hook in my shop with the extension cords at the end of the day.
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The original one on the compressor would go back to it's 3' length. It would be the one that pulled back on you. The new one from Lowes has stretched to about 10' and doesn't pull back very hard at all.
From what little experience I've had with hoses and much more with extension cords, it seems the coil hose works better for my usage style. The air compressor stays in one place and the hose is pulled where it's needed and then the end is returned back to the air compressor. The rest of the hose follows naturally.
Puckdropper
--
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On 3/27/10 4:01 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

work of course.
I like to be able to put the nail gun down, expect it to stay there, so I can come back with the next piece, pick it up and carry on. In the case of upholstery, which is what started this thread, I can see the advantage in that as well since you can put the tool down, pull/adjust the fabric and the tool is still there.
Not trying to argue (enough of that in here lately), just different stokes, different folks.
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Hmm. You're beginning to sound as if you've made up your mind. You're probably right , Robert. Ain't no way you're going to find the ideal solution. Electric staplers aren't strong enough. Air staplers are too expensive. Compressors are too noisy. Air tanks are too heavy and a nuisance to take to get filled. You should just give up and go to work at MacDonalds.
Max
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Max wrote:

I haven't made up my mind. I'm looking at all possibilities. That's also called brainstorming. Brainstorming means being open to all possibilities It's also known as "thinking outside the box".
I'll give you an example. When I was researching mounting art prints on a board, most people I consulted insisted that drymounting is the only way to go. Drymounting was not a good solution for me because it requires a large, expensive vaccuum table which I don't have enough space for, and contracting out the drymounting would not be a good option because I'd have to rely on an off-site sub-contractor and frequent trips off-site.
By researching thoroughly and keeping my options open, I found a suitable alternative: gluing the art prints to Gatorboard (that I custom-cut form four-by-eight foot Gatorboard sheets) using an art knife, and gluing the art prints to the board with an archival, museum-grade acrylic co-polymer adhesive and ordering custom picture frame from a wholesale picture framer.
Also, I have to research carefully because often people's recommendations are bad. I went with people's recommendations and so far they've all been unsuitable. Recommended to me were manual Stanley Sharpshooter staplers, manual Sears Craftsman Easy-Fire staplers, manual Arrow JT-21 staplers and Arrow electric lithium-ion. I tried them all and none of them turned out to be good solutions and I ended up returning three out of those four staplers. (I'm still using the Arrow JT-21 manual.)
Being a picky perfectionist has helped me to become a successful artist. And why should I give up and work at McDonald's? About a million dollars worth of my art and associated picture framing have sold. Ain't no way I'm giving up to work at McDonald's! (I will occasionally eat McDonald's food, though, when I feel like pigging out. :-))
Robert
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On Sat, 27 Mar 2010 16:14:11 GMT, the infamous Robert Montgomery

Robert, if you're a millionaire, why the hell are you renting, and why quibble over this? Just Do It!
-- "Not always right, but never uncertain." --Heinlein -=-=-
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Larry Jaques wrote:

I didn't even vaguely imply that I'm a millionaire. Quite the opposite; I'm broke because of the Great Recession, as I've dubbed it, and my industry has been particularly hard-hit worldwide because I produce luxury items. That's especially why I need to be careful with purchasing decisions.
Only people who are naive about running a business would assume that a farmer, real estate agent, musician, artist - or whatever occupation - who has been responsible for the sales and spin-off sales (picture framing in my case) of a million dollars worth of their products is a millionaire.
You're confusing gross sales with net profit.
And even if I had personally gotten the million dollars which I didn't you're assuming that I still have all of the money I earned, which I don't.
I also wrote that part of the million dollars was for "associated picture framing". I didn't get any of that money, and it accounts for about $750,000 of the million. But the fact the picture framers and retail art buyers were willing to pay $750,000 for the framing of my art shows that I created and published shows that I generally know what I'm doing and that it's an insult to be told that I should give up my career to work at McDonald's simply because I'm pointing out drawbacks of various options and resaearching carefully before deciding what equipment to buy.
> "Not always right, but never uncertain." --Heinlein
That attitude implies that there are only blacks and whites, whereas in fact most issues are various shades of gray. It's a simplistic viewpoint.
Your gross misinterpretation in assuming that I'm a millionaire because I wrote a million dollars worth of my art and the picture framing that went with it - has sold, clearly shows why the attitude "Not always right, but never uncertain" is foolish, because you haven't considered all of the various, possible gray areas that can apply to my statement that a million dollars worth of my products and associated products have sold.
Robert
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You've convinced me even, before I read all this, that you are someone who will get their money's worth from a compressor. Indeed, it sounds like you can't afford not to own one (unless you know where you can borrow one). FWIW, I would get an "oil-free" model. Good luck!
Bill
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Bill wrote: FWIW, I would get an "oil-free" model. Good luck!

Why oil-free? Someone wrote that oil-free models tend to be louder than oil models, and I want to get one that's a s quiet as possible.
Robert
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I wasn't aware of the volume difference. I was trying to direct you towards one which is low in maintenance--the oil models need need to be maintained much like as an appliance such as a lawnmower. However, I believe the oil models are less expensive. Hope you'll mention what you end up choosing and how it works out!
Best, Bill
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Suggestion: Buy a compressor first, then it you decide you want one, buy a tank later.
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Bill wrote: ...

I'd agree that an oilless will be significantly noisier than a comparably-sized oiler compressor.
I'd not put much stock on the amount of routine maintenance an oil compressor will have--it's certainly not using oil in the same way as a combustion engine and rarely needs any attention.
Cost will depend more on capacity than oil/no-oil I think altho oilless compressors are smaller and hence less expensive as a general comparison of types/styles overall.
If noise is an issue, any compressor will make some and there's probably not a lot of actual difference in level. I think oilless tend to be more annoying in the noise they do make, however, as well as being loud. The 5-hp upright (oil, of course) isn't nearly as annoying as the little 2HP or so Lowe's-special Campbell-Hausfield oilless.
I've not had one of the pancakes of anybody's so can't really compare there.
--
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dpb wrote:

jpb, Thank you for taking the time to explain some of these things. Much of my opinion was based on reading a few dozen reviews at Amazon, Sears, and other places. I would value "less annoying noise" and am glad to learn it is an option! : )
Bill
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