Quick Electrial Question

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Am try to install new garbage disposal and have a quick electrical quesiton.
GD Unit came with (3-prong) electrical cord attached. Unfortunately the cord does not seem to be removable. Can I cut off the plug and attach this to the romex in my junction box? I suspect the answer is no, but I have to ask. If this is not acceptable, I think the next solution is to install a new electrical outlet under the sink...
BTW, whoever installed the last one wasn't too A-R about it: there were no "romex connectors" going into the junction box, coming out the junction box, or going into the garbage disposal unit. *Scotch tape* was used to cover the sharp edges on the knock-outs on the junction box.... : (
Thank you, Bill
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On 9/3/11 3:40 PM, Bill wrote:

Short answer: yes. As long as the romex wire is copper and not aluminum.

That is the better and maybe easier solution. GFCI outlet.
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-MIKE-

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On 9/3/2011 4:40 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

Personally, I don't know that I would go to the expense and trouble as GFCI is not required under a kitchen sink for a garbage disposal by most NEC versions being used that I'm aware, and it is not really necessary in that application.
YMMV ....
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On 9/3/11 5:57 PM, Swingman wrote:

Interesting that it wouldn't be required given the likely potential for leaks and water when people are under there repairing stuff. Either way, I tend to go overboard with those things. I don't mind the cost given their benefit.
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wrote:

Just as long as you don't have to reset the damned thing three times a day eh? <g>
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On 9/3/11 6:46 PM, Dave wrote:

If that's happening, there's definitely something wrong. :-)
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-MIKE- wrote:

Like the start-up of a 1HP motor?
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Why should a 1hp motor trip a GCFI, its an earth fault current trip not a current overload device.
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wrote:

That's something I can't answer because my electrical knowledge is pretty limited. However, the small 8" desk fan I use in my bathroom which is plugged into a GFI outlet, occasionally trips the GFI when I turn the fan on. What could be the explanation for that?
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You have a problem Dave. Maybe a bad ground on the fan, water in the loc it is.
On 9/4/2011 9:09 AM, Dave wrote:

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It's faulty.
We moved into our present house in 1975 and a couple of years later decided to have an electric shower fitted over the bath. The idea filled me with a certain "unease" so we had what, in the UK, was then referred to as an "Earth leakage circuit breaker" (ELCB) fitted by the supply authority. (It sits on the house incomer between their fuse and the consumer unit (Fuse box)). Back then these were very uncommon in fixed domestic installations, though available, but are now mandatory on new installations as they were then on "Mobile homes".
A while later we started getting occasional unexplained trips but as they became more frequent we realised they were being caused by our electric kettle. Clearly the internal insulation was beginning to fail or the seals were failing allowing water to find its way into the wrong place somehow. Once replaced the trips stopped.
I have a 2kW circular saw in the garage, it never causes any problem.
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wrote:

Guess it might be. The fan has been in the bathroom for several years so condensation could well have damaged the fan. I'll toss it just to be safe. Thanks
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"Dave" wrote in message wrote:

Guess it might be. The fan has been in the bathroom for several years so condensation could well have damaged the fan. I'll toss it just to be safe. Thanks
================You may be wasting your money and effort.
Often this is a result of insulation cuts and nicks (drywall installation etc.) that do not show up until you shut off an inductive motor or other device. When the circuit is broken those devices occasionally produce a high voltage spike (counter EMF) and then the bad insulation spot shows up where the high voltage arcs to ground or other wiring. This can trip your GFCI breaker where it never tripped before.
This is not likely your fan but rather your wiring in the connection boxes. If you want to replace the fan anyway, then it would be a good step to find this annoyance. Disturbing the position of the wiring to change this out may solve the problem also.
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On 9/4/2011 9:09 AM, Dave wrote:

GFCIs are tripped by a current imbalance: if the currrent on the hot and the neutral differ by more than 20mA, it trips.
Inductive loads such as those presented by electric motors put the return current slightly out of phase with the supply current. If the amplitude of the phase difference exceeds 20mA, the GFCI trips.
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Dougy gets different water out of his garden hose than he puts in too! LOL
Need some basic electrical theory there Dougy or STFU. ------------------ "Doug Miller" wrote in message Inductive loads such as those presented by electric motors put the return current slightly out of phase with the supply current. If the amplitude of the phase difference exceeds 20mA, the GFCI trips.
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"m II" wrote in message Inductive loads such as those presented by electric motors put the return current slightly out of phase with the supply current. If the amplitude of the phase difference exceeds 20mA, the GFCI trips.
================= I would be sure Doug Miller was using an analogy and doesn't actually believe currents could be different in a series circuit. Most electrical people should know better than that.
Cut the guy some slack.
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On 9/5/2011 4:00 PM, Eric wrote:

There *is* a slight phase delay when the circuit supplies an inductive load -- which means that during a time window measured in milliseconds the currents *are* different. That can be enough to trip a GFCI.
Obviously, over anything but an extremely brief time period, the currents are exactly the same.
Equally obviously, "m II" is in my killfile for good and valid reasons. :-)
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On 9/5/2011 7:14 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

True.
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"Doug Miller" wrote in message

There *is* a slight phase delay when the circuit supplies an inductive load -- which means that during a time window measured in milliseconds the currents *are* different. That can be enough to trip a GFCI.
Obviously, over anything but an extremely brief time period, the currents are exactly the same.
Equally obviously, "m II" is in my killfile for good and valid reasons. :-)
============= Sorry, but that "delay" theory is not correct.
You may have this confused with inductance where an inductive coil electrical component exhibits a reluctance to current change.
Remember "current" flows through an inductive component and never into one without returning to the source. There will never be a difference in current in and out due to an inductive component or any component in an electrical circuit (static electricity theory using high voltage notwithstanding).
A changing voltage may create a phase lagged current through an inductor (coil) but not a current phase lagged to itself, whereby current enters a component but does not leave at. That would be impossible.
Review Kirchhoff's Current Law. (loosely stated) The sum of currents arriving at any point must equal zero.
This is not what makes GFCI units trip from fan motors. Current leakage faults to ground or other conductors causing a current "differential" (ANSI Standard C37.2 - 87) is the only trigger.
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However, this is not a two-terminal device. There is capacitance to ground, you're missing. This complicates the issue greatly. ...and yes, it is a problem, or at least was. I believe recent GFCIs have fixed this problem. The codes have been changed to reflect this.

Capacitance.
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