Quick Change for drill

Ok, I'd like the groups opinion as to the best Quick Change for a drill. You know the kind of attachment you put in your chuck so you can change out screw head bits and those specialized drill bits on the fly. I know you can get the quick-change attachement from Craftsman and Dewalt, Makita, etc.
But which do you consider to be the best and why?
For instance I do not like the Dewalt 9v adjustable angle screw-gun with its permanent quick-change attachment because it is just too easy for the bit to come out when you put it in your tool bag. I'd rather just put a quick-change in a chuck of a drill if I knew it would not loose bits if put in a bag, but was still easy to swap bits.
Thanks in advance for any and all input on the subject!
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Can't say what is best because I've only used one, the Bosch. Works well enough for the short time I've had it.
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Best is easiest and cheapest in my opinion. A simple magnetic hex chuck that I use in my chuck keyless, cordless drill.
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The problem with the magnetic holders is drilling holes. You put in a drill bit with hex end, drill the pilot hole and countersink, then when you retract the bit, it pulls out of the holder. That is what convinced my to go with the quick change and a solid mechanical device to hold it in place and one hand release.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/



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That makes sense and since I don't have any drills with hex ends, I haven't experienced it. Can I assume that keeping the drill turning while pulling it out still results in the bit pulling out of the holder?
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Keeping it turning helps, but does not cure the problem. Changing from Phillips bit to Robertson is a snap with a magnetic holder and I've used one for years. Countersinking and then screwing (make that driving screws) is more of a challenge at times. Not a big deal to drill 20 holes, then drive 20 screws, but to drill one or two, then put in the screws, them drill again, made me look for a better way.
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cheapest in my opinion. A simple magnetic hex chuck that

Problem is if you what this feature for using it everyday for a living, it has been my experience that the magnet does not hold bits well at all. I don't want it falling out during use or storage in a tool bag.
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spake:

So use a bit of stickum in the bit socket. Clay and plumber's putty (non-hardening) work fine.
- Yea, though I walk through the valley of Minwax, I shall stain no Cherry. http://diversify.com
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I'm currently working with the Insty Bit (go to Lee Valley and search).
The up side, you can countersink and recess a screw for plugs. It's easy to use. In the drill position the bit is very secure. There are Vix bit inserts as well as regular and tapered (Fuller type).
The down side, you physically remove the screw tip to drill (one more thing on the bench to watch over/keep track of/lose). Also, in the drill position there's some play but it's not horrible.
I liked the DeWalt but the set screw was too small (spent more time pulling bits out of the work) and the countersink wasn't cut deep enough to recess screws.
Of all I've used I'm compromising on the Insty Bit/finding it's better/works best for me.
As always, Your Mileage May Vary.
UA100
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I have one of those little kits - never use it since chuck keys are pretty much a thing of the past on hand power drills. Mark

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If you are making a few changes a day, it is not a big deal. If you are doing a lot of screw driving and countersinking, the difference is huge after 10 or 30 or 100 holes. One hand, two seconds.
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Two Christmas' ago, a couple of my family members, who had exhausted all other tool choices from recent years, bought me quick change sets, a Dewalt and a Porter Cable. The chuck on the PC was absolutely useless; it was nearly impossible to get the bits out reliably. The Dewalt chuch was clearly superior. On the other hand, I broke 3 of the Dewalt bits immediately whereas the Porter Cable bits are still going strong. Also, the PC drivers and attachments are IMO better quality. Bottom line: I use the Dewalt chuck with the PC cable bits/drivers.

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