Questions about resorcinol (waterproof) glue (made by DAP/Weldwood)


I've got some 6x6 spruce fence posts that I'm applying finished planks of 15/16" pine to cover the exposed part of the post (front, back, and a little of the sides). I'm using a *few* brass screws to hold the planks to the post, while a water-proof glue will bond the planks to the post.
Seems that my 2 choices for glue is (a) an out-door version of Elmer's Wood Glue, or (b) a 2-part resorcinol glue (DAP/Weldwood) that is popular in marine applications.
I've read where the resorcinol has more specific needs (temperature, humidity) which I have no problem with (this time of year)- but does the wood need a high compressive pressure while curing? I can't apply any such pressure in my case (planks are 10 ft long) so the only holding pressure is going to come from a line of brass screws running up the center of the plank every 2 feet.
Since the posts will be topped with a wide cap, I don't expect them to have direct exposure to rain, but being hit by a water sprinkler continuously for an hour at a time isin't out of the question.
Is bonding or clamping pressure critical for resorcinol?
Or do I have an alternative to Elmer's wood glue?
Who retails resorcinol in Ontario (Canada) ? Home Depot? Rona?
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Resorcinol would be way over kill for that. A better choice would be Titebond II or a polyurethane like ProBond or Gorilla. Elmers wood glue (either white or yellow) would not hold up. Titebond II would require a little less pressure and is waterproof as long as it is not constantly immersed. I have been playing with the new Titebond III and it is even better. Still not a marine glue but good for high humidity joints.
If you can't clamp a 10' 6x6 you ain't got enough clamps! No self respecting DIYer can have less than a dozen bar clamps. You are definitely not leaving the proper hints for Fathers day and Christmas. Bet you got a closet full of ties. :-)
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Glenn Ashmore

I'm building a 45' cutter in strip/composite. Watch my progress (or lack
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Glenn Ashmore wrote:

Yea, I got lots of bar clamps, but I can't clamp around the posts because the fence is already up in between the posts. Maybe fence isin't quite the right word. It's not a wood fence - it's poured-in-place concrete. So it's not coming out.
I don't think they make C-clamps with arms that are 8 feet long.
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Some Guy wrote:

Sounds like it is Spanish Windlass time.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Aren't they used to pull things together? With rope? You can't push with a rope.
I need to push a plank against a (verticle) post (assuming I really do need the pressure for bonding with glue). I don't have access to the back side of the post.
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How about using more screws and construction adhesive (liquid nails or PL)
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Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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"William R. Watt" wrote:

That only would work at the top of the post (which rises above the wall portion in between the posts). And I'd rather use a bar clamp (or two) there anyways and not a twisted rope.
Since it's impractical to rig something up to apply pressure to keep the plank against the post (but I will have some screws to hold them together), and since the plank is finished, stained, with a polyurethane top coat (rigging something against it would likely mark the surface), my original question is -> does recorcinol glue need bonding pressure in order to do it's job? I don't care how much I put on in between the plank and the post (and I don't care if it bleeds purple because it ain't gonna bleed through wood that's 15/16" thick).
This is not hard-wood I'm gluing together...
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Yes, it does. It requires a tight fit (planed surfaces) and about 125 to 150 pounds per square inch of pressure. So i'd say, forget about it. Use epoxy.
Meindert
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I'm in the middle of an exterior porch swing from White Oak. Exterior, Sun baked, White Oak - etc. I went w/ Gorilla Glue.
Time will tell if I choose poorly...
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Sounds like the boards are for aestetics.
I would go with a construction adhesive if you really want to glue. This does not require pressure and is cheap for the amount you will need. Resourcinol is expensive.
Gorilla glue or another urethane definately needs pressure. The glue foams and expands as it absorbs moisture to set off the curing. I did not adequately clamp one piece and it raised 1/8in on me.
Another option is more screws and paint over them.
Dave Paine.

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