Questions About Gorilla Glue

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Nope. Plastic resin glue is what he calls it. Urea formaldehyde, I believe.

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watch the wrap
http://www.djmarks.com/stories/faq/3 _Where_can_I_get_the_SlowSetting_Plastic_Resin_Glue_you_often_use_on_the_ 46688.asp
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Usually PVA for that sort of job. My general workbench glue is hot hide glue - a lot of what I make is "repro". Although it has a quick "grab", it's also workable for quite some time for minor adjustment.
For waterproof work it might be epoxy (not usually for timber though, unless I'm filling cracks with it). More usually it's something complicated and commercial that needs mixing beforehand - Cascamite or similar.
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screw it up

Don't use the cows brand! Gorilla appears to be the best of the best. It still isn't an epoxy strength. Use it to augment screwed and glued joints. Wouldn't use it for any type of lamination.

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It fills the gap with a foamy version of itself, but has no strength that way. The stuff works really well when gluing aluminum to balsa wood

Part of the attraction of using biscuits is that they are compressed mechanically during manufacture. Then the water in regular glues will expand them and form a tight joint. Only water-based white glues will make the cookies work like they should. Even the yellow won't work as well.

Use white glue when you can, and clean up afterwards.... when that doesn't work, there's always WEST system epoxy..and with micro balloons, you can make them gap-filling.
The whole glue business is full of marketing ideas; yellow, gorilla, waterproof, yadda, yadda, yadda.
White PVA or WEST... the rest is just a waste of time. Oh... and propane powered Imperial adhesive for laminating and Lockweld 8215 for everything else ( see WEST).
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What's your choice in white glue?
wrote:

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Thank you.
wrote:

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Red herring. The biscuits will get moisture from the wood and through the wood from the atmosphere. Instant it ain't, effective it is. Saturation is the fault most often mentioned. As the biscuit reduces again, you hope you haven't surfaced, else you can get some pits.
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wrote:

WTF does seafood have to do with this, huh? More on this inna minute.
I dare say that after tens of thousands of biscuits in my last 30 years on some very demanding surfaces, I have yet to see this magical phenomena of 'pits'. I can see the theory behind it, just never seen it. Maybe it's because I use Lamello biscuits only and their adhesive 'MiniCol' dispenser and that just lays a small bead on both side-walls of the groove. I never saw the point of soaking the whole operation.
Speaking of soaking, back in the good old days you had to soak a red herring to make it edible. Before soaking, a red herring had the texture of wood (HA! HERE is the connection!?!?!?!) All the dictionaries and reference books I have consulted suggest that the metaphor grew up because a red herring was used, not to lay a scent, but to confuse one; in particular, Brewer (DAGS him) explicitly says that red herrings were used to confuse the hounds chasing a fox. But what that entry leaves unsaid is any clue to who was supposed to be laying this false trail, or why. It seems to suggest that an early group of hunt saboteurs were at work. Though there was much opposition to fox hunting in England from the beginning of the nineteenth century, for ethical reasons, this did not extend so far as I can discover to organised attempts to spoil a days sport. There were cases of physical violence, true, but they were more likely to be by disgruntled farmers stoning hounds or assaulting huntsmen for crossing their land and spoiling the crops (a frequent source of discontent). In the half dozen books on aspects of the history of fox hunting I have searched out, there is not one reference to the use of a red herring to lay a false scent. Only in rec.woodworking does one sense the scent of fish sometimes, George.
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I doubt that it is the Lamello biscuits that keep you from seeing this divots. I have only used probably 3 or 4 thousand biscuits and have not seen this divot appear either after planing. I can really only see this happening if you are cutting slots in soft and thin material. For the most part I use 3/4" hard wood stock and had never heard of the problem until mentioned in this news group. The notion that biscuits are for alignment and they do not add strength to a joint is BS also. I will admit that they are over used in situations that they probably add little strength but when gluing solid stock to the edge to plywood stock you better believe that they add strength. ;~)
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I believe. I have tested. Even my BIL's fat ass hasn't busted any chairs I built for him. In the right application, they add a tremendous amount of strength.
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<...snipped...>

Not you usual fish story.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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Robatoy wrote: Then the water in regular glues will

I've never found yellow glue to be wanting for swelling up a bisquit. It's got plenty of moisture in it. At least all the yellow glue's I've used...
Dave
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David wrote:

Dave
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FWIW I have an old Lamello Glue dispenser that injects measured amounts of glue into biscuit slots. The instructions indicated to use a White glue as it tends to give more working time when putzing with biscuits. That said because this dispenser is more for production runs I do not use it unless putting in 150+ biscuits on a job. I typically squirt a dab of yellow out of the original glue bottle into the slot for small jobs.
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I've used Gorilla as well as Elmer's polyurethane glue for several outdoor projects. While the glue does foam up to fill small gaps, the foam is not structually strong. It is not "gap filling" the way epoxy is.
It works fine with biscuit joints. I always breifly dip the biscuits in water before inserting them in the slots, I saw this recommended somewhere but perhaps it is not really necessary.
It's a good idea to wear nitrile gloves when using poly glue, the stains on your skin will last several days and are (nearly?) impossible to wash off any sooner. IME the Elmer's brand is better than Gorilla in this respect.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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I once called up Franklin Glue to ask about that glue line ridge that pops up after a week or three (which is another whole thread). I also asked them about the difference between the yellow and the PU glues. They told me about an experiment they did. They laminated up layers of wood to make baseball bats, using both types of glues. The yellow glue held up, and the PU delaminated every time. Guess what I use on my furniture? robo hippy
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I could never get the Elmers off, and the work wasn't as strong, but the Gorilla Glue washes off fine! I left a small amount in the package open thinking I had more. When I couldn't find it I twisted off the cap and removed the film with my finger and applied it that way and washed it off... If that was the Elmers, I'd have some ugly looking hands for a few weeks!

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I think you have that all backwards.
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