Questions about cutting a raised panel

I have a Bosch 1617EVS. I just got a 3.5" raised panel bit.
First problem - The hole in the router table is only 3.2". But the shank on the bit is long enough that I could put it in a full inch into the collet and still have it above the router table. I then put the panel on a 1/4" plywood so it lined up with the bit. Is that an acceptable method?
Second problem - After setting the router to the minimum speed, I tried a 1.5" cut. It was immediately obvious that it wasn't going to work, but that was as far forward as I could move the fence. So, I clamped some 3/4" stock to the fence and tried again. Better, but still no good. I added a 1/4" piece to the fence. With a 1/2" cut it worked, but still not very well. Am I doing something wrong, or is a 12a router simply not powerful enough to handle a bit that big? (or maybe minimum speed is too slow?) If I have to make 1/4" cuts, a whole door will take forever!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In general I would say that is not an acceptable method because you're going to want to do the panels in multiple passes, starting with the bit only partially protuding up through the hole. Make or purchase a larger diameter insert.
Brian.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Try a Stanley #10.
--
Ross
www.myoldtools.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ross, I think you have the right idea; but maybe the wrong approach. Try putting a thicker plywood sheet on the router table top (thick enough to fully retract the router bit below the surface). Then, set the router to remove wood at about 1/8 inch on each pass. Make the last pass at a cut depth of only about 1/32 inch or so - this will produce a well finished "clean-up" cut. Using this approach allows you to cut the full profile width without moving the fence for each cut - you only need to raise the router each pass until you reach the panel relief depth that you want. Using this approach, I have successfully cut 1-1/2 inch wide panel relief profiles with a 1 HP router. Remember to slow the router speed to about 10,000 RPM when you use the large diameter panel relief bits. Good luck, Jim Seelye

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What does "no good" mean?
I've made plenty of raised panels with the same router and Freud and Whiteside bits that size, in several hardwoods and MDF. I leave one side of the fence locked in place, clamp a stop block behind the fence at the other side, and with use 2-3 passes for the fence to return to the stop block. I do all the doors, move the fence, do all the doors, move the fence, done! While I wouldn't recommend this for an all-day door making setup, I've happily made 10-12 doors at a sitting.
Is the bit sharp? What brand and model is it?
Are you using an extension cord? If so, how long and what gauge? Are you plugged into a good, stout A/C supply?
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
in message wrote:

is okay, but it sure doesn't feel right. It is a brand new CarbTech. It is part of a 5 piece set, and the other 4 are fine. Plugged directly into a 20a circuit that runs my 17a TS okay, so its not the circuit.
What speed do you set for with a bit this size? I had it all the way at minimum; maybe that is too low? Otherwise, all I can figure is that setting above the table is wrong somehow, but the cut was nice and smooth.
I appreciate your help.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's where I'd put it, maybe a notch above minimum speed.
Keep in mind that at slow speeds it takes the tips of that large bit much longer to make a full circle than the small bits you're probably used to using, so the feed rate has to be adjusted accordingly.
The motor pitch of my router does change, but it seems to maintain speed.
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In rec.woodworking

I'm pretty sure that is impossible.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 02 Jan 2004 16:52:02 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com (Bruce) wrote:

Come to think of it, you're right. So I guess the speed is changing.
I should clarify that the speed that's left has been suitable for the job, in my experience.
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No, it's not.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In rec.woodworking

pitch - The distinctive quality of a sound, dependent primarily on the frequency of the sound waves produced by its source.
Key word, "frequency"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Pitch" is simply a tones position in a scale and is frequency dependent, as you say. However, I would tend to describe the "distinctive quality of a sound" as its "timbre".
The pitch can change, while the timbre of the source remains characteristic ... IOW, a clarinet still sounds like a clarinet, even though its pitch changes during a song.
Same with a router, AFAICT.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 1/02/04
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.