Question re motor rating on Griz 1023s saw

Hi all,
just moved from the states to Borneo, and slowly unpacking my tools and setting up shop. Running into a problem with the saw, which Grizzly state is 18A, and needs a 20A circuit. We've been told that we're unlikely to be able to get anything more than a 15A circuit put in here, and that only for the AC unit in what will be the workshop. However my plan was to have an extra socket put in on the AC circuit and just turn off the AC when I want to use the saw.
Now the starter switch, on the saw is rated 220v, 2200w. Now in my book, that equals 10A, and starting load would be the highest I would think. If so, I could run it on a 15A circuit, with a couple of amps to spare.
If not, I may be stuffed with not being able to use my saw here.
Could anyone who is more knowlegable about electrickery please comment on this. Am I really likely to blow out a 15A circuit?
Cheers,
J.
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JP wrote:
<snipped>

I tried to look at the spec for the saw on Grizzly's web site but get an error. From the information you've provided I'd say the 18 amp rating is at 110 volts. 10 amps at 220 volts would equate to 20 amps at 110 volts. If you are talking about a 15 amp breaker on a 220 volt line you should be fine as the saw will draw about 9 amps. If it's a 15 amp breaker on a 110 volt line the saw will be tripping the breaker.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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Nova wrote:

I finally was able to get the spec for the G1023S. It's a 3 H.P. motor drawing 18 amps at 220V. A 15 amp/220 volt breaker would be insufficient.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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What I don't understand is the comment that he could not get a 20A circuit. Must be talking to the wrong people as he can get most anything he wants as long as the main power and box are up to it. Ed
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No, it's very unusual to get that sort of thing here. I'm in Borneo, and the local camp housing is limited on the amount of current each house can draw, and on how much each section of the camp can draw.
We can't just call an electrician in and have work done, it has to be someone from the company works department, and the guidelines say no circuit over 15 amps. I'm going to try and pursue it further, but wanted to check first whether I really needed to.
What puzzled me was that the starter switch has a plaque on it saying it's rated 200v, 2200w, which only works out at 10A. The manual states that it needs 18 amps, hence the confustion.
J.
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That makes more sense now. Are you willing to share the saw? If so, perhaps you can convince someone that it is in the best interests of the community to have the saw running, either at your house or some other location.

I don't know how it is set up. Sometimes a low voltage relay is switching the power for a high voltage motor.
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Justin Peer wrote:

Before I did stuff with the wiring the lights in my shop would dim when I fired up the 120v G1022. If I fogot and left the shop vac turned on the breaker would trip every time. However, once the saw was up to speed I could run the saw, vac & lights no problems.
If you can figure out another way to get the blade & motor spinning about 1/2 to 2/3rds of full speed before you turn on the power maybe 15 amps is enough to _run_ the saw if it doesn't have to _start_ from zero RPM. I have used a lot of belt-driven farm equipment and I'm reasonably confident I could put a 2nd pulley on my G1022's motor and use a horizontal-shaft 1 to 2 HP Briggs & Stratton gas motor to do the initial spin up. I don't know about the G1023 though. The motor enclosed in the cabinet makes it more difficult.
Or maybe someone knows if this is a bad idea electrically, e.g., "Spinning the motor like that with no complete circuit causes a flux capacitence buildup that has been shown to cause cancer in lab rats." I dunno...
-- Mark
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Sounds right scary to me. I don't think I'll go that direction. I've seen things like that at the local saw mill, and I steered well clear of it.
Might work though.
J.
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Justin Peer wrote:

Interesting. Most of my ideas aren't so original after all. ;-)
If it wasn't for the shipping costs I'd be willing to swap motors with you... <g> Mine runs fine on a 15A circuit.
-- Mark
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Mark Jerde wrote:

If you're going to all the trouble to hook up a gas engine to spin it up then why not just run it off a 3 horsepower gas engine?

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
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J. Clarke wrote:

One of many points I didn't mention.... ;-)
I've actually thought a lot about these things, since my "dream shop" would be located where electrical power is known to be tempermental.
-- Mark
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Mark Jerde wrote:

What about purchasing a 220V A/C generator? If you have frequent power failures it might come in handy for things other than running the table saw.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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In Borneo? You sure?
don't understand is the comment that he could not get a 20A circuit.

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Actually it may work with a normal thermal circuit breaker rated for 15 amps. The rating on a circuit breaker is not the limit of the current going thru it. It should be able to handle 2 times the current rating for some period of time, ususally 5 seconds. On 220 that should get you up and running and the current draw below 15 amps. The 18 amp rating is only when the motor is developing the full 3 hp. There is some current used just in running but it would not be much over 4 or 5 amps.
Tom
Nova wrote:

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Somebody wrote:

You need a 2P-30A c'bkr for this motor.
Feed with #10AWG copper wire with 105C insulation.
Have fun.
--
Lew

S/A: Challenge, The Bullet Proof Boat, (Under Construction in the Southland)
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