Question on routers and router tables

Page 3 of 5  
wrote in message

I did remove the plunge springs from mine, it made the adjusting easier. If you go this route be aware that the spring is under a lot of tension and will fly out of the plunge tube even though you are holding on to the cap. DAMHIKT!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

Yes, however the spring is "intended" to be removed easily. Remove a plug and take out the spring.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have to agree with Leon. I have the larger Triton in my table and absolutely love it. It has variable speed and will take anything I throw at it and laugh!
YMMV
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hammer Hands wrote:

My 3HP Makita 3612C (an old design but still a goodie) has an electronic brake. I don't know whether the Triton (or any other popular "3HP" router) has that feature, but I *love* it, and any new router I bought would most certainly have to have it.
--
See Nad. See Nad go. Go Nad!
To reply, eat the taco.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Do you like that brake when used in a hand held operation and do you have to hold the switch for the motor to continue to run? I don't think that would be a big deal when used in a router table situation but I can certainly see the value in hand held usage.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

Funny you should ask, because the Makita is my table router and I got tired of taking it out of the table for hand-held operations so I bought a Dewalt combo pack. I agonized over that purchase because the Dewalt had all the features I wanted *except* for a brake, and to this day I wish I'd found a different combo that had one. I like the brake for both table and hand-held operations. I wish my tablesaw had one! :-)
--
Any given amount of traffic flow, no matter how
sparse, will expand to fill all available lanes.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve Turner wrote:

Sorry, I forgot to answer your question about the switch; no, the Makita has a toggle switch so you don't have to hold anything down for the motor to stay on. Flip the switch to the off position and the brake kicks in. Don't know how it works, but it's pretty spiffy.
BTW, does your Laguna bandsaw have a brake? My MiniMax does; you step on a pedal which kicks the motor off, then applying downward force to the pedal forces a brake shoe (like what you'd find in a car) against the inner surface of the lower wheel. I *really* like that...
--
Any given amount of traffic flow, no matter how
sparse, will expand to fill all available lanes.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I find that really odd that it has a toggle switch and a brake. IMHO the brake is a safety feature. Most all hand tools with a brake, drills and miter saws, use the "dead man" style switch, if you let go the tool shuts down quickly. Again IMHO that brake is not going to help much if you get into trouble and need to shut the router off quickly. With the spring loaded switch you would simply let to. Anyway I can really see no advantage to the brake if you have to move your hand to shut the router off. I can wait for the bit come to a stop during normal operations.
Am I missing something here?

Yes my Laguna has a foot brake that works the same way and cuts power to the magnetic switch. Additionally if the top and bottom wheel covers open the power is shut off to the switch and there is a large red push button kill switch.
Both my 12" disk sander and Laguna have the manual brakes but I seldom use them unless there is a visitor in the shop.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

A safety feature, sure, in that you don't have a dangerous bit spinning endlessly after you've finished your cut and you're either waiting to remove the workpiece from harm's way or you're done with the operation. You've shut the router off; now it would be nice to move on with your next operation or train of thought without fear of absentmindedly encountering that spinning bit. In many cases a spinning bit or blade is simply a time waster; you're waiting for the dumb thing to stop so you can set that router down, make a height adjustment, reposition a fence, etc. A stationary cutter is a safer cutter.
--
See Nad. See Nad go. Go Nad!
To reply, eat the taco.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I suppose that would be a nice feature if the router came with it but I have no problem waiting 5 or 6 seconds for the bit to spin down to a stop. I had a serious run in with a TS blade about 20 years ago. I have learned to be patient and watch the blade or bit actually stop spinning if I don't walk away. Getting in a too big of a hurry will eventually catch up with you.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

You don't have to wait for the tool to wind down to continue with whatever.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Absolutely true and yes it can be annoying but it really only takes about 5 or 6 seconds to come to a stop. I have that kinda time. ;~) All things being equal I would choose the router with that feature if and when I buy another but I really don't put that feature up there as being a deal breaker.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

Of course it's not a deal breaker, but I equate it with the euphoria you have after buying your first cordless drill or pneumatic nailer. You're like, "How the he!! did I ever get anything done before I had this!?" :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, Steve indicated that it might be a deal breaker in the future. Agreed, if you have it you probably appreciate it more.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I can't speak for Steve. I speak for -MIKE-.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sorry Mike.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

Just razzin ya, brother.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
-MIKE- wrote:

Yes, it's kinda like that. :-) After running that Makita in a table (and by hand) for so many years, going to a router without a brake was annoying. And I *knew* I wouldn't like it because I've also had many occasions to use my buddy's router table (and he mine) with the Porter Cable 7518, and discovering that it (the Big Bad Boy of table routers!) didn't have a brake was a disappointment to us both.
The other machine that I *really* wish had a brake (and you can probably relate to this -MIKE-) is my recently acquired Eighties vintage Craftsman 10" radial arm saw; it takes *forever* to spin down. My Dad has the bigger 12" model and it *used* to have a brake, but then it quit working and you can really tell the difference.
--
Any given amount of traffic flow, no matter how
sparse, will expand to fill all available lanes.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve Turner wrote:

Yep. I think it would be easy (relatively) to design an after market brake. It could be a couple of rubber(ish) rollers on springs that would clamp the blade like brake shoes. When power is turned on, an electromagnet would pull the rollers off the blade.
I know the regular brakes work using the existing motor and brushes in some way and would probably be a bear to retrofit.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
-MIKE- wrote:

You know, I actually wondered how hard (or unsafe!) it would be to mount some kind of bicycle brake arrangement to the RAS blade...
--
Any given amount of traffic flow, no matter how
sparse, will expand to fill all available lanes.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.