Question on routers and router tables

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hello folks I have a question concerning the types of routers to use on router tables, my old combo router table w/router got busted up and I need to get another setup but I don't want to go with another cheap combo setup, I want to get an actual table router, my question is this I have a 2HP black & decker evs plunge router no fixed base can this router be used on a router table? without a fixed base? I have seen some advertised using plunge routers
TIA
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"Daryl" wrote:

These days a 3HP Milwaukee is getting favorable comments as a table router.
Lew
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The most appropriate router nowadays is at least 2hp, maybe 2.5 or 3 and has a plunge base with a built in ability to set the height from above the table. This can save you the money of an expensive raiser setup and give you the conveinience of the above the table adjust.
Lots ofd times they sell kits with both types of bases so you at least still have a fixed base to keep for hand work and you just need to drop the router out of the plunge base that is attached to the table when yoyu need to do hand work.

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Depends. Do you have a way to fasten the router down securely when using it in the table? If not, then you need to find out how to do that first before doing anything else. Otherwise, get another router.
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Daryl wrote:

1. Yes, your B&D can be used in a table, with or without a fixed base. All you need do is attach the existing base to the table insert.
2. A more powerful router would be better. Routers are essentially *trimming* tools...they weren't really meant to serve in place of shapers; nevetheless, that's the way people are using them so more power is better.
3. There is no such thing as "actual table router". Routers have either fixed bases or plunge bases; either type can be used in a table. It may or may not be easier to adjust bit height with a plunge base.
--

dadiOH
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For the most part, you're right except that Jessem offers a Milwaukee router without any type of base that's intended only for table mounting. It appears to be permanently wired into a separate power/speed controller so adding a base (if there's one that fits) to it for free hand routing would be awkward at best.
http://www.jessem.com/new_products.htm
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Upscale wrote:

JessEm makes the most incredible stuff. I'd have one or more of everything they make if I could afford it. :-)
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See Nad. See Nad go. Go Nad!
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From the blurb about the router motor on Jessem's web site:
"15 AMP, 3-1/2 MAX HP "
Never happen!!
It's either a 3-1/2 HP motor or it's a 15 amp motor, but running on a 120v circuit it's for durn sure not both. 3.5hp on 120v requires a minimum of 22amps and that assumes a unity power factor and 100% electromechanical efficiency. It's far more likely that the router motor develops something closer to 1.5HP.
Jessem and/or Milwaukee is not alone in grossly over inflating the HP in their advertising literature.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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On Sun, 22 Mar 2009 11:07:27 -0500, Tom Veatch wrote:

What's even stranger is that some manufacturers offer a 2.x horse router and a 3.x horse. The 2s usually draw 12 amps and the 3s 15. One horse out of three amps ain't perpetual motion, but it's close!
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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I'm trying to imagine a real 3 hp router. I think it might be a little top heavy ;)
Anything with a universal motor in it they pull that crap.
The advice I would give as far as router tables go, don't even worry about all the above the table adjustment stuff. You have to go under the table to lock and unlock the height anyway, so wtf is the point? It's easier to just turn a knob than get your adjustment wrench and get it inserted and engaged.
-Kevin
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snipped-for-privacy@YAHOO.COM wrote:

The point is that it's easier to precisely adjust the height if you are making the adjustment from the same side of the table as the one on which you are making the measurement.
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I disagree. I generally need to get my eye down level with the bit to set the height and where are my hands then? I do have my router table at a higher height than most people probably do so that may be part of it. I have it about 4" higher than my TS. I would much prefer a router that was designed to have all the controls on one side and easy to read when mounted in the table than the through the table adjustment. I can't see what speed it's set to on mine without sticking my head in there, so I have to move it to one extreme, turn it on and then listen to the speed changes. I used the through the table adjustment a couple times before giving up on it, and having that built into the router was one of the reasons I chose that model so it's not like I didn't expect it to be worthwhile. Just in practice it was easier without it.
-Kevin
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Have you seen a CNC router?
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snipped-for-privacy@YAHOO.COM wrote:

I've got a cheap Ryobi router table and a cheap Ryobi router to go with it.
As it turns out, a nut-driver easily fits in a hole in the router's table and engages the shaft for the bit adjustment. I simply adjust the height where I want it, the reach under the table and slap the height lock.
What IS missing is someway to lock the router shaft for changing the bit. I solved that by drilling one hole and adding one guide such that a push on a 1/4" rod from the front of the table engages the shaft lock. I can then work on bit changing from the top.
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Well concerning those statements, your set up may be like that but not all routers and or router lifts are the same.
Many router lifts, some routers have no lock or have the need for a lock under the table. My particular router has a lock but it is not needed when used in the router table configuration. The lock might be needed if I used my router in a hand held application in it's plunge configuration.
Some router lifts only afford you the ability to and or are much easier to adjust from above the table. Still in my case there is no router table height adjustment on top however the collet is loosened and tightened from on top of the router table.
Having said that I pretty much go with your school of thought myself but realize that not every one uses the same router that I do so different factors will have varying degrees of importance to the user.
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I have the smaller Triton, and I have from time to time forgotten to lock it without anything seeming to move, but it falls in the category of why risk it? Does it actually say in the manual you don't need to lock it in table use?

The above the table bit changes with one wrench are definitely awesome. And they give you a "real" wrench, which totally shocked me.
-Kevin
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snipped-for-privacy@YAHOO.COM wrote:

I've got a real 5 hp router, and it's not especially top heavy - it's just heavy... and the power cord is a bit heavy, too.
:)
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Morris Dovey
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quote the maximum power. The average power of a single phase motor is half of the maximum power. Hence both average hp of 1 3/4 is the same as maximum hp of 3 1/2. The amount of work that you can do is more closely associated with the average horsepower.
Jim
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On Sun, 22 Mar 2009 11:33:36 -0500, Jim wrote:

I heard somewhere that a conservative horsepower estimate can be made for 110V equipment by taking the amp rating and moving the decimal point one place left. IOW, 13 amps is 1.3 horse. Remember, I said conservative :-).
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On Sun, 22 Mar 2009 21:38:10 -0500, Larry Blanchard

Probably not a bad rule of thumb.
In your example, 13 amps at 120 volts = 1.56 KVA (or KW if you assume a power factor of 1.0) = 2.09 HP (PF = 1.0, Eff = 100%)
2.09 * (PF)*(Eff) = 1.3 or an estimated (PF)*(Eff) = 0.62 which is in the ballpark for the product of the values. 80% efficiency and 0.8 PF would be 0.64..
My 3HP tablesaw has a FLA of 14 amps at 240v. Using that rule of thumb with 28 amps at 120 gives 2.8HP. Not far off, and a little conservative as you suggest. That's assuming the advertised 3HP is correct.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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