question on proper table saw use

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I read the message below from davefr (thanks dave). It didn't answer the two safety/procedural questions I have on table saws:
1. Is it ok to make a "cross cut" with a table saw? -- i am installing my own floor (vermont soft pine) -- the boards are too wide (9 inches) to fit a in my miter saw -- i thought i read somewhere that you're only supposed to make "rip cuts" with a table saw -- not cross cuts.
i'm a woodworking newbie trying to save some money on my house. hence the cheap, kmnothole-ridden wood, which brings me to my 2nd question:
2. Is it ok to cut through a knothole with table saw? If not, what is the best tool for that?
Thanks very much,
C.Line
------------------------------------------------------------------- Search Result 1 From: davefr ( snipped-for-privacy@REMOVETHIS.com) Subject: Re: Table Saw safety guards View: Complete Thread (84 articles) Original Format Newsgroups: rec.woodworking Date: 2000/04/23
Most kickbacks are prevented by proper table saw use:
- Avoid using the mitre guage AND fence to make a cut. This is a big No No!! - Avoid ripping warped or damaged wood. If you have to, then attach it to a straight piece of wood. - Adjust the blade height enough to just clear the work - Make sure your fence is calibrated so it's parallel to the blade. (it's a good idea to give it a couple thousand of an inch extra clearance at the rear) Check this annually and never assume a brand new saw is properly calibrated. - Keep you blades sharp and use the correct blade for the cut. - Don't stand in the line of fire. Work in a position that's not directly in line with potential kickback. - Use a featherboard when needed - If the cut will put you in harms way than consider using another tool. A bandsaw can be much safer for cutting damaged wood. - Hearing protection, safety glasses, dust mask, and even a hardhat will help protect you. - Work when you are fresh and alert and think thru every cut before you make it. - Ask yourself if you can accomplish the cut safer using a different tool. Sometimes you can make a rough cut on a safer tool and use the table saw for a finish cut. - Get an outfeed table for your saw. - Work in a well lit area. - If you are more comfortable using the guard then use it.
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Yes. It's bets if you have a crosscut or combo blade and most accurate and safest if you build and use a sled.

Yes. But the knot may fall out.
--
"I'm a man, but I can change... If I have to... I guess." -- Red Green

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Cut away. Use a combination or cross cutting blade. Use the miter, not the fence. Don't use both or that can cause a kickback because the fence will cause the board to skew a bit. . You can set the fence an inche further from the blade than you want to cut. Then you clamp a 1" spacer to the face of the fence, but only near the fron. You can bring the board to the stop and then ush ahead with the miter. That allows for a repeatable stop but without the potential kickback problems from the setup.
It can be a little hard to hold a nine foot board to cut off an inch. Use some common sense and be sure you are pushing the board squarely.

There are knots and thee are knots. If it is tight you can cut it. If it is loose at all, thee is some risk of it breaking and pieces becoming a projectilre. The guard helps with this sort of thing. There are names for the types of knots. I don't recall them at the moment.

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wrote in message

the
from
Use
for
frank and judy are common knot names, although shauniqua is growing in popularity <g>
randy
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I think it is easier to use the chop saw. Make the cut as far as the blade will go, then flip the board over and line the blade up with the kerf from the first part ofd the cut and finish. We've been making cuts like that for long enough to get tired of it so we bought the Makita 12" sliding miter chop saw that has a 12" capacity at 90 degrees. That helps, but now we are working with 12" and wider boards 10 or 12 feet long making 30, 45, and 60 degree cuts. You can't really do that on a table saw. Some of the material is surfaced 3 sides, so when the board is flipped, there is no straight reference on the back side. You have to take the time to accurately line up the board for the second half of the cut so that the blade lines up with the kerf to necessary tolerance. We used to use a worm drive as we are framers first - woodworkers second. A radial arm saw is probably ideal for this, but the lack of portablilty is a big negative.

I've had loose knots fragment and come flying out in my face on the table saw. Eye protection is mandatory. You're not supposed to have your face right in the line of fire, but I do a lot of free hand ripping to a chalk line (no fence at all), and when trying to maximise accuracy, its hard not to get your face in the danger zone. I've been thinking about a face shield acutally. Use the chop saw - the fragments get thrown away from you.
Larry Church Mintlake Lodge
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On Sat, 24 Apr 2004 06:30:23 GMT, "Larry Church"
I was in agreement up to here:
| but I do a lot of free hand ripping to a chalk |line (no fence at all),
Say it isn't so.
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"Wes Stewart" wrote in message

It is a very common practice on construction sites around here ... AAMOF, you are more likely to see a good looking female framer working topless than a table saw fence before the trim crew arrives.
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than
im guessing these the same guys that remove or disable the safety device on the nail gun...
randy
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depends on the jobsite.
I *have* seen good looking females working topless..... on a project at a nudist gathering...
<G>
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|"Wes Stewart" wrote in message |> On Sat, 24 Apr 2004 06:30:23 GMT, "Larry Church" |>wrote: |> |> I was in agreement up to here: |> |> | but I do a lot of free hand ripping to a chalk |> |line (no fence at all), |> |> Say it isn't so. | |It is a very common practice on construction sites around here ... AAMOF, |you are more likely to see a good looking female framer working topless than |a table saw fence before the trim crew arrives.
I think it was common practice too when my Mother's step-dad removed all of his fingers on his left hand and ended his carpenter career.
Coincidentally, my wife's father lost a couple of finger tips ignoring common sense safety TS practices too.
When I tried freehanding a cut on a TS in a shop class the instructor about had a fit and told me in no uncertain terms that that's what the %&*#@+ bandsaw was for.
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"Wes Stewart" wrote in message

than
I am not advising you to practice it, I was merely explaining the reality of the situation.

... and what the wise guys on the construction site would tell you, in both English and Spanish, albeit less politely, is that according to ER statistics, yuppie hobbyists, with overpowered, fence equipped table saws in their garages, are far more likely to lose their digital attachments.
... and FWIW, my recent relative acquisition, Uncle Teet, tells me that he lost the first knuckle of his ring finger on a bandsaw ... so be careful either way.
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[snip]
|I am not advising you to practice it, I was merely explaining the reality of |the situation.
Understood. | |> When I tried freehanding a cut on a TS in a shop class the instructor |> about had a fit and told me in no uncertain terms that that's what the
| |... and what the wise guys on the construction site would tell you, in both |English and Spanish, albeit less politely, is that according to ER |statistics, yuppie hobbyists, with overpowered, fence equipped table saws in |their garages, are far more likely to lose their digital attachments.
Wish we'd send all those Mexicans home. In Tucson, you're statistically far more likely to be injured by being in the crossfire between drug or alien smugglers or a crash (nearly happened to me) with them running from the Border Patrol, than by using a tablesaw.
| |... and FWIW, my recent relative acquisition, Uncle Teet, tells me that he |lost the first knuckle of his ring finger on a bandsaw ... so be careful |either way.
I'm reminded of an incident from my youth. I was working in my dad's automotive machine shop and cut my finger deeply doing something or the other.
I wrapped it up in a shop towel and drove myself to our family doctor. When I went to the reception desk and said that I might need stitches they went into full-blown panic mode and wanted to look at it, asked me if I was going to faint, etc. etc. I said it was no big deal and took a seat.
When I saw the doctor I related this concern by the receptionist and asked about it.
It seems that a week or so earlier a guy who worked for a drilling company had come in under similar circumstances and they just asked him to take a seat and wait. He was sitting there reading a magazine when another guy hurried in the door and said, "Hey John, we found your finger, maybe they can reattach it."
Lost fingers were so common in the drilling business that they didn't make much fuss over it.
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"Wes Stewart" wrote in message

My last woodworking related trip to the ER involved a table saw and was no doubt statistically reported that way ... although the saw did not have a blade on it at the time, and was even not plugged in.
I was installing a _safety_ device ... a Uniguard, and inadvertently turned it into the business end of a guillotine in the process ... 13 stitches, and a numb to this day, but still functional, thumb.
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Swingman May I award you ............. what would that award be? ;~)
Injured by a TS safety device.
Glad to hear that you came out mostly OK. Just goes to show you, you cannot be too careful around big equipment.
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"Leon" wrote in message

LOL ... More like a National Enquirer headline, instead of an award:
"Dumb Sh*t Injured By A TS Safety Device"

cannot
It's been over a year now ... anyone reading this who attempts to install a Uniguard by themselves, get some help!
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| |"Wes Stewart" wrote in message | |> I'm reminded of an incident from my youth. I was working in my dad's |> automotive machine shop and cut my finger deeply doing something or |> the other. | |My last woodworking related trip to the ER involved a table saw and was no |doubt statistically reported that way ... although the saw did not have a |blade on it at the time, and was even not plugged in. | |I was installing a _safety_ device ... a Uniguard, and inadvertently turned |it into the business end of a guillotine in the process ... 13 stitches, and |a numb to this day, but still functional, thumb.
Ouch!
I had a TS injury just yesterday too.
After 60 years of Arizona sunshine, many of them spent, in the pre-airconditioning days, driving around with my left forearm resting on the car door, my skin is so damaged than just a little pressure on it will leave a purple blotch.
I walked around the TS and bumped my forearm on the corner of the back angle iron rail and left a half-dollar size patch of skin and hair behind. Damn I hate that.
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I believe that he meant "free hand with a Skil-type saw" not a table saw.
I hope
Mike
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Maybe. But with a TS I have seen Norm do it on TV. And I do it on occasion but only on 1/4" plywood panels with the blade very low. Keep an eye on what you are doing and know the problems that can happen and you can do it without mishap.

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On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 03:59:21 GMT, "Leon"

Howdy,
Indeed, you can but...
When something goes wrong (and it will) the costs may be profound...
The simple reality is that a sideways twitch of the board being cut can cause a problem that will reveal itself in tiny fractions of a second. At the speeds involved, the skills of the operator at that point are meaningless.
All the best,
--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
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Yes it will and can. Regardless of how careful you think that you are, that is not careful enough. I have been using a TS seriously for the last 20 years and professionally for the lasy 9 years. 15 years ago I lost half of my thumb on the TS. I was not cutting when it happened and this happened agter I has shut off the power to the saw. My mistake was that I got in a rush and started making adjustments before the blade stop spinning.

Agreed again. However I have observed a few things that have proven true and goes contrary to many peoples thinking about more powerful saws. First off, I do not free hand the cuts on wood that would not snap, break, or cut easily. I also always have a very firm hand on the wood during the free hand cut. What I have observed however is having used a 1 hp Craftsman TS for 15+ years and now a 3hp Jet cabinet saw is that the Craftsman being under powered was more dangerous. With a sharp blade on both models and a Jet fence on both the Craftsman and Jet cabinet saw the chance IMHO of a serious kick back lessens with more HP. I find that with a firm hand and more HP the TS is more likey to cut the board rather than get bound up slow down and toss the wood back. With the lessor powered saws you have to baby the wood to keep from stalling the motor and again IMHO the lack of a firm hand leads to a greater possibility of the wood binding and being kicked back.

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