Question on gas struts for a table top

I'm building a dining table with a copper covered top. I plan on sandwichi ng 2 3/4 ply with 1 1/2 ply to get a 2" thickness. I figure this will weig h in the neighborhood of ~100lbs.
Anyway, we live in a small house where storage and space are at a premium. So I've been thinking that what could be cool is if we were able to hinge the top and lift it to expose some storage below it. The aprons are 3 1/2" so it wouldn't be deep, but the dimensions would be around 20"x 50". My w ife would then be able to use this as a desk as well, put her laptop and so me paperwork in it. I could just do a drawer but I thought this would offe r more space be kind of cool. So, my question is where would I buy gas str uts for assistance in lifting it and what exactly do I look for in somethin g like that?
If it's a bonehead idea for some reason I'm not seeing, please feel free to point that out.
Thanks, Jim
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wrote:

Sounds heavy and "warpy". Have you considered a torsion box with maybe hardwood stringers?

How about (perhaps multiple) gas shocks from a car lift gate? After market gas cylinders should be cheap and they should be available for many years if you choose a popular car.

It just seems too heavy and "floppy", without some rigid elements to "stiffen" it. Others, here, have far more experience with such things, though.
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On Tuesday, October 14, 2014 10:24:35 AM UTC-7, jtpr wrote:

So, you rest your arms on the table and get a chill? It sounds... uncomfortable.
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On 10/14/2014 2:28 PM, whit3rd wrote:

Maybe he plans to hook a couple of wires and make it a resistance heater. Keeps your dinner warm too.
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Mebbe he lives in a hot place and wants to cool down?
Actually, the copper covered thing seems to be a fashion. Where I used to work the executive conference rooms had tables with copper covered tops.
I'd suggest looking at an RV parts store. RVs tend to have lots of stuff which lifts up and folds down, with gas struts of various sizes.
Not knowing how to size a gas strut, I'd suggest planning for multiple (if possible) and taking some out if it's too much lift.
John
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On Tuesday, October 14, 2014 5:36:55 PM UTC-5, John McCoy wrote:

The table top will only be 20" X 50" and 2" seems overkill for thickness or stability, especially if it has a skirt. A 1" top shouldn't be that heavy , to require struts.
The back edge will need some little space for hinging, so why not make that space 2"-3" deep, then the lifted top will have room to lean back and stay put (maybe with a latch), without having to have struts to keep it in the upright position. I doubt it would remain up for long periods of time, any way, if the lower cabinet will be storage.
The space is to be used for another (other) function(s). The space for the installation of struts, for the top's lifting function, only, seems to me, would take away from the space for storage. Maximizing the storage space would be more important, than the lifting of the table top, which may rarel y be raised or remain in the raised position for very long, as compared to the need for max storage space.
Sonny
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On Tuesday, October 14, 2014 1:24:35 PM UTC-4, jtpr wrote:

igh in the neighborhood of ~100lbs.

e the top and lift it to expose some storage below it. The aprons are 3 1/ 2" so it wouldn't be deep, but the dimensions would be around 20"x 50". My wife would then be able to use this as a desk as well, put her laptop and some paperwork in it. I could just do a drawer but I thought this would of fer more space be kind of cool. So, my question is where would I buy gas s truts for assistance in lifting it and what exactly do I look for in someth ing like that?

Ok, first off, I screwed up the dimensions. The top will be 3'x 5'. The l egs and aprons will be inset in 2" to a side.
The reason for the 2" thickness is that is what the bride wants. We have a kitchen island with a 2" concrete top and she likes the look of that.
As for the copper, we saw a table with a galvanized top in a store and like d it. Then, a few days later I was informed that the color wouldn't go and copper would be perfect. Color decisions in the kitchen are above my pay grade.
I like the idea of running power through it. Might be a reason for me to g et a cat.
Also, I do like the idea of the torsion box. Having looked at that online I think it will be the way to go. In fact I'm now considering using 1/2" MDF just because it would be uniformly flat. But I need to find out if I c an adhere copper to it and what to use. I think at this point I'll go with that idea if it seems feasible and then worry about the lift idea.
However, if I don't go with the hinged idea and I do use the MDF torsion bo x concept, what would be a good way to attach it to the base? I was thinki ng perhaps putting in a few small squares of plywood inside the torsion box and screwing through the MDF and into then with pocket screws.
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On 10/20/2014 03:25 PM, jtpr wrote:

http://www.formica.com/en/us/products/decometal http://www.colorcopper.com/pages/Copper-Tables.html
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