Question on cutting with Compount miter saw

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On 7/9/2012 4:35 AM, Bill wrote:

NO ...
It is a simple process, put the 3" baseboard standing up against the back fence, and cut it at the appropriate angle, usually ~45.
~ Baseboard goes flat against a vertical wall, so cut it flat against the vertical fence.
~ Single piece crown molding generally installs at an angle against a wall and the ceiling ... it is this angle the complicates things, if you let it.
Fastest and easiest way to cut crown molding is upside down, at the same angle it will interface with the wall and ceiling, using both the vertical fence, and saw table.
That is all there is to it.
This is not rocket science, but it turns into it when you start doing the calculations, or using the formulas, to cut molding using the compound feature.
It is a good bet that less than 1% of those who buy a "compound" miter saw ever use the "compound" feature.
AAMOF, it is rare that a professional trim carpenter will ever use the compound feature. In years of building houses, I've never seen one used on a job site, even for the most complicated, ornate, two part crown, never.
Throw your money at something else more useful.
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On 7/9/2012 4:35 AM, Bill wrote:

Base board molding tends to be non symmetrical and because it appears that your CMS only tilts in one direction you are pretty much locked in to cutting the molding in the standing up position. You will be switching the angle from one 45 degree setting to the other 45 degree setting to do the other end for near 45 degree corners.
If you lay the molding on its back and make a 45 degree bevel cut for one end you will have to turn the molding over to the face to cut the other end and if the molding is not symmetrical this will not work. So your best bet is to have the bottom of the molding setting on the saw table.
With all that said you will find that probably no corner in your house will have a perfect 45 degree corner and they all will be different. If you are painting the moldings get close and calk or cope the ends to fit better. If staining use stainable or like colored putty or cope for a better fit.
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On 7/9/2012 7:45 AM, Leon wrote:

molding with the back on the CMS table you can keep it laying on its back and cutting the other end by flipping ends however again if the molding is not symmetrical and the top is tapered, which most are, it cold slip under the fence.
Basically less problematic with the base board standing and making angle cuts.
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On 7/9/12 4:35 AM, Bill wrote:

Baseboard is best cut with the top and front towards you, so it is the first part to be cut by the blade. This is so any tear-out will be avoided on the front of the trim. The top/narrow section of baseboard is very easy to tear out, even with a very sharp blade.
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Thank you to everyone who posted to this thread, it was very insightful!
The "(3 layer) crown molding" in my house is not put up on a diagonal--so that was a source of confusion for me when I started the thread. It's great when people share with you what you need to know, rather than just what you ask!
Thank you, Bill
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On 7/9/12 2:38 PM, Bill wrote:

I'm sorry.... what!? Are you telling us the put up crown molding flat against the wall.... parallel to the wall? Please take a picture... I have to see this. :-)
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