Question on cutting with Compount miter saw

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I was looking at pictures of DEWALT DW713 10-Inch Compound Miter Saw at Amazon.
(Amazon.com product link shortened) I don't have a miter saw, but I've been looking for a while. In the 3rd picture they show crown molding being cut with it lying diagonally. That doesn't seem very "supportive" to me, compared to the horizontal base or the vertical fence. The picture preceding that one is interesting too (it shows a 3" molding being cut resting on it's 1/2" edge--in that one I'm assuming the the molding is being supported by the side of the fence that you can't see (as well as the base).
It appears that the base is really the superior cutting surface of the saw, so I'm not sure if one would make a mostly-vertical cut against the fence. An explanation for the first picture I mentioned would be helpful. I hope the answer is not "just to make the piece fit in the saw"!
Thank you, Bill
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On 7/8/12 3:13 PM, Bill wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)=
Most people figure out a way to cut crown molding that works best for them and stick with it. There are many ways and you have to find what you like, because another guy may hate that approach. Some use blocks on the fence and table. Some use a jig. Some lay it flat and use the angles conversion table that comes with most high end miter saws.
I've tried many ways and I settled on the Bench Dog Crown Cut jig. I like it because it's not "attached" to the saw, it's very visual with diagrams showing you exactly how to position the piece of molding for the proper cut. It works very well, works for *me* and it's very portable.
BTW, the way the crown is positioned on the saw in that picture works fine as long as your trim is good quality. That 1/2" or less on each edge is plenty enough surface for the trim to sit at the proper angle, securely, when you're holding it. Sometimes you get trim with a really sloppy factory primer job that leave glops and drops and bubbles on the edges that can make it hard to "sit.' But a little sand paper or card scraper can take care of that.
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-MIKE-

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-MIKE- wrote:

Mike, Thank you for your reply. I downloaded a copy of the Crown Cut jig manual and it is furthering the explanation. It doesn't not take long to see the value a jig like that! In the DeWalt reviews, many complain that a DeWalt hold down clamp is $50, is not at all easy to track down, and that it should come with the saw!
Thanks, Bill
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Don't be hung up on the DeWalt. There are other fish out there. Play with them so see which one you think is best. The lack of a hold-down would be a black mark but you'll probably want to add your own anyway.
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snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

On my path of learning about these things, I have learned that bigger does not necessarily mean better (especially regarding accuracy). One thing I like about the 10" one I linked to (DW713) is that it's vertical height enables it to cut 4by4s, whereas Hitachi's less expensive unit for intance, does not.
Which one or two do you think are best? I'm the guy who bought a DeWalt 10-Amp drill, when he should have bought an impact driver! %-)
I think the right answer is that ya need a couple of these things to have ones bases covered, but I'm not going there yet!
Cheers, Bill
The lack of a hold-down would be a

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I don't know what you're looking to spend but I too was almost set on a 10", until I started really thinking about the cuts I wanted to make. I needed to cut a bunch of pieces of 2x to match a 15:12 pitch hip roof. The 12" saw came in quite handy. ;-)

Dunno, I bought a Bosch. I like it a lot but the dust collection could be a *lot* better. Basically, it doesn't pick up anywhere nearly close enough to the blade, so most of the chips blow right on by the dust pick-up. Putting a dust collector on it is almost useless. I bought a "tent" sorta thingy to go around it to at least try to keep the dust local. I'd sure be leery about this if I were to replace it.

I bought three DeWalt drills; gave two of them to the kid. They were too heavy for the power. I kept the third, largest one. It has the second handle for big jobs (but that's what I have the hammer drill for). It doesn't get much use. ;-)

Drills/drivers? You betcha! I lost count of them. ;-) ...but my favorites are the Bosch 12V. They're light and powerful enough for anything short of a 10x4" screw (and the driver will set a couple of dozen of those).
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You're replicating some functionality, but not all. It's worth having both tools, even if the tailed drill doesn't get used all that often.
DAGS for Tom Watson's (I believe) "Ode to a corded drill".
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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Puckdropper wrote:

It popped right up. It was Very Heatwarming! : )

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On 7/8/12 4:11 PM, Bill wrote:

IME, miter saw hold down clamps are only beneficial to one-armed users. :-) BTW, if you're just doing one job with a bunch of the same crown molding, five minutes with some scrap and super glue and you could have a great jig. These adjustable ones are worth the extra money if you're doing lots of different sized crown.
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Or your walls aren't square (are any?).
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On 7/8/12 11:25 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Do out-of-square walls affect the angle at which the trim is held against the fence when cut?
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-MIKE-

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On 7/9/2012 9:35 AM, -MIKE- wrote: ...

Better to adjust the angle of the dangle of the cutting arm/head rather than try to fiddle w/ the work.
W/o a solid stop for it it's much more likely to grab and move thus ruining a sizable chunk of material (and if that was the second-end cut, your day just got a whole lot less pleasant... :( )
Not to say I haven't and don't do it on occasion ( :) )--but it's not the better way, no...
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Sure. If the walls aren't plum it's going to have an affect, no?
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On 7/9/2012 12:58 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote: ...

Yeah, and an off-white wall is _much_ than a shade of violet, indeed...
:)
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On 7/9/12 12:58 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

That can all be compensated for in the angle of the cut. Why move two objects instead of just one? Of course, when fine tuning a cut, I've been know to pull the end out just a tad..... which can be done with a portable jig.
In any case, whenever possible, I mark the cut, not measure the angle. Meaning, with the trim on the wall, I mark the entry and exit points of the cut and use those to set my miter angle.
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-MIKE-

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On 7/8/2012 3:13 PM, Bill wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)=
As Mike said, everyone has a different approach that is comfortable for them. I prefer cutting crown in a shop made jig, thusly:
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopJigsFixturesMethods#5762901962496036914
Note that for this to work, the crown is cut upside down:
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopJigsFixturesMethods#5762902068916500178
Rockler also has a reasonable priced jig that works the same way, which also has some suggestions for uses which may help your understanding:
http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page 565
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I get by with a HF 12" slider. If you want precision, go with the Bosch or a Festool. Prices are $180, an arm and a leg, and both legs + your firstborn, respectively.

It is resting on both flats, top and back, so it's stable. No worries.

Huh? Look at the pics more closely. The flats on the back of the crown moulding give it a pretty good stability to cut against. If you're careful, there is relatively little pressure by the saw blade, which has super sharp teeth spinning really fast, on the piece.
-- Truth loves to go naked. --Dr. Thomas Fuller, Gnomologia, 1732
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On Sun, 08 Jul 2012 14:59:03 -0700, Larry Jaques

Good description. ;-) I also have the HF 10" slider (<$100). It really isn't a horrible tool, though I don't think I would use it for woodworking. It's great for construction jobs, though. If it rains on it, I haven't lost a lot. ;-)

...and a simple jig will give it all that much more stability.
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On 7/8/2012 3:13 PM, Bill wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)=
Compound miter saws are a fairly recent development. Crown molding has been cut for years by setting it upside down in a miter box (hand or power) set at the "spring angle" of the molding and then cutting an inside coping angle or an outside miter.
Any good miter box, even a homemade wooden saw guide allows laying the molding up on the back edge or down on the bottom. It is the whole reason for having the tool. I guess I do not understand your dilemma.
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DanG wrote:

Thank you Dan. I was just trying to understand how to use the tool properly. Two previous posters got me passed the "bumps" I was stuck on earlier. Thank you for your offer of assistance!
I actually have more (3") baseboard molding I might replace, than anything. Do you think that the saw doing a better job cutting it standing up, lying down, or doesn't it make any difference?
Bill
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