Question: old ext. cords

I have an old short (12') extension cord. It is, by far, my favorite. Unfortunatley it is has worn out. The cord is totally tangle free. It never kinks or holds a bend. Just throw it out and its staight. It has very small ribs running the length of the cord. I have several newer cords of various lenths, but none hold a candle to this one. I've checked the borg and Ace and even a few old hardware stores. No luck.
Question: This cord came from Connecticut cira 1960's. Does anyone know if these cords are still made?
Gary
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How is it worn out? Is the cord cut and frayed? If not, you can buy commercial grade plugs and receptacles at your neighborhood hardware store very reasonably. Ten minutes work and you're good to go!
Bowhunter
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Go buy some good lamp cord like it at an electrical retailer and some ends and make a new one. I've got one just like it, though it's only about ten foot long now. That's what it is, lamp cord.
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I'm sorry but that's got to win the prize for the silliest observation I have read in a long time, If you hurry you can catch the 10% off Sears sale too. Thanks for the laugh.
Jon~
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Well, fyi, I'll be there with my Craftsman club discount card!!! But, why is it a silly observation? My mom, rest her soul, had a set of lamps circa 1950ish in her attic that had a round, ribbed, rubber cord on them. They was about 8 foot long or so.Very flexible. I work along side sever I/C and residential electricians and asked them about the cord. They told me of 2 electrical supply houses in town that still carry that cord. It's paper wrapped 14 gauge stranded copper conductors. No ground. Mind you, I don't use my flexible in -10 degree weather cord for running anything but a drop light in a very dim lit area that I have to be working in, but it does exist. I would suggest you rummage through some antique shops and you'll see what I'm talking about. I didn't say I use it for my tools, nor did he. He was talking about the flexibility of it. Stick to putting the real tool cords on your tools, and the new fangled lamp cords on the lamps. It is still gettable from the right places.
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Good point...he did not say he was using it for power tool use.....I admit it.....I made an ass out of u & me <g> Enjoy the sale!
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Jon Down
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HAHAHAH No you didn't. You just said what was on your mind, as did I. No harm done to either one of us. And, I will look forward to seeing you at THE SALE also!!! <G>
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LOL
For many years I have serviced their after warranty junk (mostly when the customers had already been quoted way too much by Sears for the same repair I might add) so I will not be purchasing anything from their overpriced then discounted tool dept thanks. They have had many tools over the years that were very good value (mostly many years back) but way too many were home use tools dressed up like professional tools & aimed at the handyman....get them serviced / fixed before the warranty runs out or buyer beware! Remember I know in the most part who made them in the first place, their worst trick was having them specially made for Sears with out of the ordinary size, shape, voltage etc accessories so you were forced to go back to Sears for them. Most towns small or large have a hardware store but not all have a Sears, not always convenient. Stick to the reputable name brand tools & in the most part you can't go too far wrong.
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Jon Down
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On 2 Mar 2004 15:01:05 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@llc.net (Kunk) wrote:

As I don't have a picture, I don't exactly know what you have, but I wouldn't be too surprised if it was rubber insulated cord. It is sometimes sold as heater cord. Good stuff, and you should be able to buy it by the foot at the local eletrical supply. Make sure you get the proper wire size for the current you need to carry. Add a good Hubbel recepticle and plug and you are set to go. Of course, it is going to be more expensive than almost anything you can buy pre-made.
DLGlos
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Take a look at the characters that are printed or embossed along the length of the cordage. If they can still be read, look for a cord like that, using those characters & numbers.
Barring that, I've got a cord they call a Yellow Jacket (suprise - it's yellow) that behaves as you describe. Heavy gauge, very long and very flexible. I've seen them for sale at Ace hardware.
On 2 Mar 2004 15:01:05 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@llc.net (Kunk) wrote:

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