Question fow wood shop teachers

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On 12 Dec 2004 06:56:51 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Maybe.
Some work as many or more hours as any other job. Homework needs to be corrected, planning needs to be done, etc... Summers are spent learning the new fashionable curriculum of the year, selected by politicians. I know some teachers that seem to live at the job.
Others don't, like my gym teacher neighbor.
Be careful with generalizations. <G>
Barry
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Touche.
Admittedly, my mom has been in administration for quite a few years, and most of her stories are about teachers like your neighbor. This is exacerbated by the fact that she's one of the people who go the extra mile. I further acknowledge that the life of the teacher has gotten increasingly difficult, and my own mother said to me that she herself would not go into education today. But don't let that stop you, guys! <g>
-Phil Crow
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My mom is a teacher, and my wife used to teach before she realized _it wasn't worth it_, and my cousin is a teacher. But as a disclaimer, it's still just anecdotal evidence from the both of us.

For the most part, I'll agree.

I'll go along with that one, too.

This one seems like a dream, eh?

Here's where I disagree. Teachers have to grade homework, create lesson plans, supervise certain after school activities, parent-teacher conferences, faculty meetings, etc. I would say that teachers put in just as much time per year as a regular 40 hour/week rear-round job. And that means that without the holidays & summer vacation, you would see open revolt, if not an utter collapse of the work force. Or in other words, the holidays and summers are simply a well deserved vacation.

That's what it sounds like.

You get what you pay for. And I know a number of engineers who would _love_ to be teachers if it weren't for the "abysmally low" pay. And I guarantee you they would know what they were talking about up at the chalk board.
So I'm telling you that if there was a substantial increase in teacher's pay, you would get droves of much more knowledgeable people teaching these classes (or at least in the realm of science & math). And I would add that the best math/science teachers I ever had started out in the engineering industry. But the only reason they started teaching was because of a "missionary mindset".

One thing my mother has said is that it can be extremely rewarding in the sense that you get to know some wonderful kids. But if you get a class full of screw-offs, and on top of that a principle that does not support the teachers and cowers before "PC" parents, get ready for some stress. That is why my wife walked away.
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Generalizations just don't work in either direction. Deserved by some, but not all. I can name names of some of the laziest people in the profession. When school is out, they are DONE. I know these people personally and can attest to what they do not do.
I appreciate you wanting to stick up for mom, but like any profession or trade, there are plenty that are just there for the paycheck. A few years back our teachers got big increases to attract more and better teacher. What really happened is that a couple of drones that were going to retire decided to stay and pump up their pensions.
The entire education system sucks, IMO. We pay a lot of money per pupil in the USA and get far less return than what other countries get. It is a combination of bloated administration offices, unions that back up low performers, ACLU, and parents that send their kids to school because the don't want to have to watch them all day. Ed
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You can say that again. My wife had to work with a real doozie. She supposedly had all this "tenure", but some of the stories my wife told about the things she had done/said in the one year she taught was disturbing.

I guess I do have a soft spot for her in my heart.

in
Now you're preachin' to the choir. I know we are spending more on education than we ever have, but somehow I don't think the money is going where it ought to be going.
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Entry level in western PA (Pittsburgh area) is in the high $30s. The district I work for (not as a teacher however) tops out at just over $80 in 17 years (that last year is called a "jump step" you go from $58,000 to $80,000 in one fell swoop). Fully paid medical, dental, vision, life etc. (family coverage is %50 per month, no medical co-pays at all, drugs are $10 generic, $20 name brand). Job security out the wazoo (you can't get fired short of killing the kid or having sex with him or her), 193 work days. I still would have a hard time teaching under today's rules though.
As to folks jumping into teaching, if you already have a degree in the subject you wish to teach, you might be able to get a teaching certification after 1 year of full time added college. How long it would take someone with a language degree to get the needed degree and certification to teach "technology education" is anyones guess.
Dave Hall
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David Hall wrote:

Two years. Or about 27 the way I would have to do it. Half an hour every fifteen weekend.

Don't need one, that's the whole point! :)
It neatly bypasses the fact that I'm not certified to teach.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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As a long-time college instructor (and even far more of a long-time wood-working person) I URGE you to leap at the opportunity!
Imagine for only a moment that you would actually be in a position to do more good for a kid's life in but a single semester than others could / might / had-but-blew / etc over a lifetime. We NEED more kids who can work with their hands (constructively) and vocational edu has all but disappeared from our schools (and not replaced with college-acceptable academics).
It's needed. You have the opportunity of a lifetime that ANY educator would cry for and ... you _have to ask_????
Do It. Today.
(Please.)
--
-- Steve
www.ApacheTrail.com/ww/
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my wife's middle school (7&8 grades) is in the exact same situation. anyone looking to transfer into the paradise valley school district in phoenix az?
regards, charlie
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wrote:

Agreed as per previous post. And it's not just one kid's life, either. I had a friend in HS who went on to be a carpenter based on his shop classes, and I've been a carpenter and metalworker for my entire adult life. If it wasn't for shop, he'd probably be stacking groceries, and I'd probably be in prison. Instead, we're both useful members of the community. Another one of the guys I knew went on to be a shop teacher in Tokyo. Hell, shop classes make a big difference in a lot of men's lives, especially when you don't have much to look up to at home.

Aut inveniam viam aut faciam
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