Question for Forrest WWII users.

For those of you using the Forrest WWII I have a couple of questions as I am considering purchasing one of these. First of all do you use this blade for all your cuts? I am constantly changing between my rip blade, crosscut blade, etc. and this is my main reason for looking at the Forrest. From what I understand, it excels at all types of cuts. If you don't, what cuts do you change the blade for? Also, I'm leaning towards the regular kerf 40 tooth model (10"). Anyone use the 30T or the thin kerfs and if so what do you think? Thanks.
--
BeerBoy



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Most cuts.

Yes, it does. I have the 40T thin-kerf, and it makes very smooth rips and crosscuts. I also have a WWI on my radial arm saw; it does an even better job on crosscuts.

For cutting melamine, I have a Freud blade specifically designed for the purpose, and it does indeed do a better job. If I'm cutting a lot of particle board or MDF, I switch to a less expensive blade (Freud combo).

I bought the thin-kerf when I had a 1.5HP contractors saw and it worked very very well. I've since upgraded to a 3HP Jet cabinet saw, and I'm still using the same blade. I may get the standard kerf sometime, but I don't really see much need for it right now.
-- Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
How come we choose from just two people to run for president and 50 for Miss America?
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i change it for double sided melamine only. otherwise it's ALL the blade I need! :)
dave
BeerBoy wrote:

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I have the WWII and I use if for everything, I have had it for over 2 years, and I just took it off because the proformance had dropped off. I went to the delta blade (combo) that came with my unisaw and determined that the WWII was in fact dull, so I need to send it back for a tune up. Very happy with the WWII blade. I may start to swith between the blades when I get it back.
I also have the Forrest Chopmaster 12" in my dewalt miter box and it is still going strong, got it at the same time as the WWII.
Mike Coonrod
BeerBoy wrote:

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I have a 12" in my saw "most" of the time, but like anything, it wouldn't do it all. You still need a true rip blade but the WWII does a pretty fair job on cross cutting. I got some chipping on plywood but again, it can't be all things to all people.
Don't expect it to be put in the saw and nothing else goes in. That ain't gonna happen and you still be happy.
If you cut a LOT of plywood or melamine, a high tooth count blade is MUCH better.
I also keep a Freud combo standing by for lots of different work, like pressure treated southern yellow pine.
BeerBoy wrote:

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Based on my experience with a well tuned table saw, the regular kerf 40t WWII will be all the blade you need for any cut, including plywood. It's the only blade I use for everything from cabinets to fine furniture.
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I use my WWII for everything. Never swap the blade out except for the dado (also a Forrest). It's been cutting strong for two years without needing to be sharpened. I do clean the gunk and crud off the blade on a regular basis.
Bob

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Have the 40T regular kerf. First one was a bit out of round or something and was replaced under warranty as it was throwing sawdust over the wood and leaving saw marks down pine.
In cutting some pine I think it could/should be smoother. I have been cutting purpleheart lately and it is glass smooth. As smooth as my hand planes can bring the surface. It also doesn't cause tearout on reversing grain like my hand plane does.
Have quite quite a bit of 1/2" baltic birch and NEVER had any tearout. The blade is a ATB. I think a square cut blade would be good to have as well if you plane on nibble dado work or box joints.
Alan
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I've got a different blade I put on my Delta Contractor saw when I'm cutting metal, and a Freud dado set. I use my 40T thin-kerf WWII for _everything_ else.
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etc. ...

I keep the WWII on my Unisaw in most cases --- except:
1) If I have a lot of ripping, I'll use a thin kerf Freud ..
2) If I'm cutting lots of plywood, I'll use a plywood/laminate blade ...
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"BeerBoy" wrote ...

I have the 40T regular kerf WWII. I have had it for a few years now and I pretty much use it for everything and I have never been disappointed. I have a special 60T carbide blade I used to change to before the WWII for plywood and melamine but that blade doesn't see much use anymore. I cut mostly hardwood and I have not had any reason to be disappointed in the performance of the blade. I have the chopmaster (if I remember the name of it correctly) in my Hitachi SCMS and it gives me glass smooth cuts just like the WWII. There isn't a better blade in my opinion.
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Cheers,
Howard
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