question about water stain on wood dining room table


Hi, Recently I spilt a small amount of water on my wood dining room table. I am not sure what kind of wood or what type of treatment the table has. This happend about 1 week ago. Now, when I look at the table it looks cloudy in that area, a type of film.
What would be the best way to treat this? something that would be conservative. Thank you KOS
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
KOS wrote:

Oh boy is this any open ended question. But here goes -
You didn't mention how long the water remained on the table top. If it dried via evaporation and you have hard water it could just be hard water residue. Four O steel wool, rubbed GENTLY followed by some soft cloth rubbing might do it.
If you want to err on the side of caution - leave it be for a month and the moisture that got into the finish may evaporate out. If the water spot bothers you - put a CLOTH place mat or napkin over it. Works for shellac assuming it wasn't a lot of water and it only got into just the surface coat.
Was the finish ultra shiney - ie grand piano shiney? (lacquer / catalyzed lacquer finish?) Was the finish shiney - ie formal dining table? (shellac or poly) Was the finish semi-shiney" - ie "country" dining table? (oil finish)
Find a finished area of the table that's not normally seen. Dampen a Qtip in each of the following and see wich one(s) softens or dissolves the finish Paint Thinner (oil based or water based varnish or poly) Denatured Alcohol (shellac) Lacquer thinner (lacquer) Let the spots you tested dry. If it wrinkles it's probably an oil base, if not - it's probably not oil based.
Be aware/beware. Poly and most oil based finishes require mechanical bonding between coats - ie sand between coats to get a little "tooth" to hold the next layer to the previous layer. Sanding through one or more coats to remove a flaw will leave "witness marks" - you will see the edges of the layers you sanded through. These "witness marks" will show through any transparent or translucent finish you apply over them. With "hot" finishes, like shellac and lacquer, each coat dissolves a little of the prior coat, forming a continuous finish that's easier to repair.
You might also go to www.woodcentral, get to the Finishing group and ask there.
charlie b
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
hi, what about just some simple toothpaste or mayanaise? WHen the water was spilt, I quickly dried it off.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
KOS wrote:

If a little spilled water on the finish for a very short time caused clouding of the finish - I'd skip toothpaste - which has more water in it AND is abrassive. Adding an oil and egg emulsion doesn't seem a good idea either.
There's a good possibility that the clouding is occuring in a wax finish on top of the underlying more durable finish. Do you know if the table top was waxed or have your waxed it? If so, try rubbing the area with a wax "polish". Most have a solvent in them which dissolves some of the previous layer - and maybe the "cloud".
charlie b
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.