Question about using a bull nose router bit in a router table

I am trying to make a half round edge on a piece of oak with a 1/4" round over on top and bottom. For reasons I won't bore you with, I can't use a 1/4" round over bit on one side and then flip the workpiece over and use it on the other side. I have a router table with a fence. I'm thinking about buying a bull nose router bit to get the job done smoothly. Can I push the wood along the fence with this bit or must I use a hand router and guide?
TIA.
Dick Snyder
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I am trying to make a half round edge on a piece of oak with a 1/4" round over on top and bottom. For reasons I won't bore you with, I can't use a 1/4" round over bit on one side and then flip the workpiece over and use it on the other side. I have a router table with a fence. I'm thinking about buying a bull nose router bit to get the job done smoothly. Can I push the wood along the fence with this bit or must I use a hand router and guide?
TIA.
Dick Snyder
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Both the two 1/4 and the bullnose would require the same fencing setup. Ad hoc fence with the image of the bit cut into it, and ride the 'nose. If you could fence the one, you can fence the other. The advantage of the table over the hand-held should be obvious.
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My 1/4" roundover has a bearing so no fence is needed.

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George
Well, until it is time to flip the wood and do the other side, NOW you don't have a flat edge for that bearing to run against
John
On Thu, 27 Jan 2005 17:29:56 -0500, "Dick Snyder"

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I pondered this as well, and I'm guessing something is fastened to one face preventing him from flipping it over.
George said the following on 1/27/2005 3:42 PM:

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I have done a bullnose on a table. If you are really really careful, you can set the fence so the center of the bullnose just kisses the wood. Then it goes across the fence without a problem.
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Sorry to be dense here but I don't quite understand. Do you mean that the deepest part of the bullnose just touches the edge of the workpiece? If that is the case I guess the right strategy would be the old sneak up on it where I would move the fence back from the bit and make a cut. Repeat until the deepest part of the bullnose just touches the center of the workpiece edge.

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Yep, sneak up on it as you stated with a test piece until its just right.
Bob.
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I'm hoping you've done the math and know with a 1/4" radius top and bottom you're limited to a 1/2" bullnose bit and your stock is 1/2" and not 3/4"?
If your stock is 3/4" I'm thinking there might be a bit all ready to go from someone like CMT (at least I see it in my head).
UA100
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I think if you use 3/4 stock you get the 1/2 inch part rounded properly and a flat on either side of the curve. Someone made a bullnose cutter that had two radius cutters on an arbor with a ball bearing between them so you could adjust the blades to round over both the top and bottom edge at the same time. max

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I think I have found the solution with help from all of you. The right answer is to take the bearing off of the my round over bit. That way I can get the wood close enough to round over the flip side without the bearing getting in the way. I can use my fence to control the offset of the wood from the bit. I have posted a drawing of what I am trying to do on apbw if you care. In any case, thanks so much for your effective help as usual.
Dick Snyder

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Well, you could have left it on, and merely isolated it by using it to set your fence. It's then the same as not being there at all. Lay a straight edge on the fence across the opening, adjust until the bearing just touches, clamp the fence.
Visions of a bald guy with a bowling shirt and a lump on his head....
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On Fri, 28 Jan 2005 07:03:47 -0500, "Dick Snyder"

bearing?? I use bits with bearings on the router table all the time ... to me, the bearing is sort of a guide when setting the fence..
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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Example of cut and setup at the http://www.patwarner.com/routertable_jointing.html link.
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My jointing fences are actually made on the jointer - stop in the middle, and a lot less fiddle.
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