Question about trimming bottom of steel door with wood core


My back door had been sticking for years ever since I had new lineoleum with underlayment put down, had gotten so bad over the years that I have had to cut parts of the floor away and tug hard for it to clear. You have to pull up on it and tug hard to get it open halfway, then it's stuck.
It's like pulling teeth to find someone to do odd jobs reasonably, so I've been sleuthing. A guy who came to fix the toilet and garbage disposal graciously took the door off for me, we hauled it to his van (heavy sucker), he took it to the hardware store, I had called ahead to explain exactly what I needed and the composition of the door, they'd trim it for $5. When he got it to the hardware store, they wouldn't do it. I guess it might ruin their $150 diamond saw blade, and I had evidently talked to some kid at the front desk.
Now what to do? I have called the hardware store again to find out about a saw blade. My granddaughter's boyfriend has a cirular saw; I had one but it disappeared like so many things do if they aren't nailed down around here, and I was told that I should buy the right size blade for his saw called a "cutoff wheel" for metal and that we might need two, watch that it doesn't heat up too much.
Does this sound reasonable? I wouldn't mind a new door and put this one on the garage and get rid of the horror that is on there now, but I know you are just asking for problems especially since the garage door is hinged from the opposite side from the "problem" door. The current one is on there "backwards" because it was once the back door to the house, same as the "problem" door now..
I have two really nice doors my daughter picked up out of some junk, and they might fit the garage; I don't know, didn't like the style as well as what's on there, but you can't be too picky when you are trying to get things done on a budget. They are wood and could be cut down for the garage, but I really didn't want either one on the garage and certainly don't want them for a back door.
Now I find out in my city I can have cement poured for new slab on porch and new steps, can erect two arbors, but I have to get an $11 permit to hang a new door on the house, if I go that route!
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He's right. Buy a metal cutting blade for the circular saw and go at it. You will probably have to make the cut in several passes on each side. You shouldn't need two blades for something as small as a door.
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-Mike-
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A metal cutting blade has no teeth so you can't simply cut the end off the door in one pass. It grinds the metal off more than cuts it off. You have to set the depth of cut to something less than the thickness of the metal cladding and make a pass the full width of the door. Then, increase the depth of cut some and make a second pass. Continue until you are completely through the cladding on one side of the door. Turn the door over and repeat on the other side.
As for your concern for the bottom of the door after you trim off the end - you could always cut a piece of wood that fits snugly into the cladding. Finish it with a door sweep and you would be all set.
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-Mike-
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A 'metal' cutting circular blade AKA composite blade doen't cut. It grinds/erodes. It makes sparks and heat. Any wood or plastic material behind or under the cut line will burn/melt. At the bottom of the door this may not be an issue. What may be an issue is the thin metal cladding on the door is ripe for warping from the heat and the paint will burn. You might want to think about taking the door to a metalworking shop and having them run it through a bandsaw or if you know someone with a bandsaw, buy them the metal cutting blade (about 18 TPI or more) for the use of the saw. You can do this in one pass.
Pete
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I'm fed up with my garage entry door and two windows (glass broken, door not worth putting new glass in), not the one the car goes through, it is nice, replaced several years ago but in good condition because it seldom gets used. So I'm getting new ones from a millwork company and having them put in right (new framing) even though some people would think it silly to spend money on that garage. It looks like a little Martha Stewart cottage and I like it. If I sell this place, it will be all wasted because a new owner would doubtless want a two car garage facing the other way to exit to a street that didn't exist when this bungalow was built in about the 20's or 30's (never could find the date). I can't worry about what a new owner might do or not do.
In the process of talking to them about that, they will come look at the job, give me an estimate talk about options for the garage, and take my back door into their shop and cut it for me. It will cost about $100. That is cheaper than buying a new door, and even though this is an older model, it is sturdy and well made, probably better than ones you pick up at the big box stores today. Plus I won't have to worry about reframing, hinges, handle, lockset, etc., on the door that needs cut down. Now I just hope everything goes according to plan.
Thanks for all the input everybody.

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Instead of renting a circular saw blade rent one of those portable bandsaws. They're quiet, cool and accurate, and you won't be as likely to end up in the emergency room with steel splinters or abrasive in the eyes.
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