Question about the GRR-Ripper

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I was wondering if any of you here bought and tried the GRR-Ripper. Any positive comments? I'm pondering getting one for those narrow cuts on the table saw but I'm not sure it's worth 70$. Gheez, it's heeluva upgrade over a push stick made out for free from the scrap pile.
Thanks for any advices!
Wally
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yeah, i like mine. a lot. it pretty much performs exactly as advertised.
the only thing i regret is that i don't have two.
--- dz
Wally wrote:

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yeah, i like mine. a lot. it pretty much performs exactly as advertised.
the only thing i regret is that i don't have two.
--- dz
Wally wrote:

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yeah, i like mine. a lot. it pretty much performs exactly as advertised.
the only thing i regret is that i don't have two.
--- dz
Wally wrote:

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umm... oops. sorry guys.
still trying to figure out how this free broadband in the hotel actually works. doesn't like my mail server.
--- dz
David Zaret wrote:

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How much are your fingers worth? :-) I thinkt hey are worth every dollar... not just for safety, but for the versatility in allowing you to make cuts on the tablesaw that were otherwise very difficult, or dangerous to do.
Here's my detailed review of the GRR-Ripper and MJ Splitter products... have a read: http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com/reviews/grr-ripper.htm
-- Regards,
Dean Bielanowski Editor, Online Tool Reviews http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com Over 50 woodworking product reviews online! ------------------------------------------------------------ Latest 6 Reviews: - Ryobi EMS1830SCL 12" SCMS - Bessey K-Body Clamps - Lumber Wizard Metal Detector - Pocket Hole Drilling Jig Project Book - Kreg Universal Bench Klamp - GRR-Ripper System & MJ Splitter ------------------------------------------------------------
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I agree with you about the GRR-Ripper, but the splitter is a POS. Mine broke right away, but was no loss because it was almost impossible to make a smooth cut with it anyhow. Now I just have those silly holes in my zci

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I've found uses for it on the router table also. Works great and makes certain cuts a lot safer.
--
Paul O.
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I own two GRR-Rippers. They are great for small and short pieces. I also own the Grip-Tite 2000 system (two magnetic feather boards and a 4" high metal fence). I use the Grip-tites a lot and would buy them again without hesitation. The website for GRR-Ripper talks about using two GRR-Rippers walking end over end for ripping long stock. No thanks. This requires good coordination and concentration. I've tried it a few times and never got the hang of it. Unfortunately, the company will only tell you how to do this by selling you a video tape.
For narrow cuts, I use the Grip-tites. The only time I use the GRR-Ripper is when I have short pieces.
If I had it to do over, I would only buy one GRR-Ripper, but I would buy the Grip-Tite system first.
Bob
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I was going to ask how one would use the Grip-Tite with a fence that was made of aluminium, but watching the video, I see that he added a steel fence plate. Looks like an efficient easy to use system.
Thinking about it, I could probably pick up a few rare earth magnets from Lee Valley and possibly make my own home made Grip-Tites for a few dollars less. Probably not worth the bother though.
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I think the Grip-tite featherboard has a lot more in it than meets the eye. The magnets on these units are extremely strong. Everything on the unit - the angle of the lexan blade, the release lever, the size of the spring, the size and angle of the sandpaper roller -- reflects a lot of prototyping and testing to get the balance. The rollers are even set at a slight angle to pull the wood against the fence as you push it forward. The steel fence plate option is a well made machined piece, not something you would readily pick up in Lowe's.
I've used these almost daily for 10 months and sort of expected them to show a lot of wear and tear, especially the little sandpaper rollers. They are still like new and work as well as the first time. The designer obviously chose some tough materials and put them together in a nice package.
BTW, I have a Jet Supersaw with factory aluminum fence. I used a piece of 3/4" hardwood plywood to mount the Grip-tite fence. It was pretty straight-forward.
Bob
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The Gripper's nice, but I made a narrow strip ripper for about $1 and about 15 minutes. It's two scraps of MDF and an old mouse pad. If you need to buy the mouse pad, It'll cost $3. <G>
I can post pictures somewhere if you'd like.
Barry
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wrote:

Send me a photo. I would like to see what you came up with.
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wrote:

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On 18 Sep 2004 14:27:23 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Eric Anderson) wrote:

Will do!
I'm running a mountain bike event Sunday, so it might not be until Monday, but I'll get it up on the Web.
Barry
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On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 01:52:36 GMT, Ba r r y

Here it is:
<http://www.bburke.com/wood/jigsandtools.html
I didn't invent it, I only use it.
Barry
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Al,
Looks like it will do the same thing as the grr-ripper device. I use a thin piece 1/8" to 1/4" piece of shaped plywood to just push through the thin part. I hold on to the wider part (well out of range of the blade). Is there some reason why that is not sufficient? I have never used something like your device. It seems like it would provide some lateral stability that would lessen the concern of your hand canting over if someting like kickback happened.
By the way, your router table looks like the same color as mine.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v384/eganders/0ce312c4.jpg

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On 21 Sep 2004 17:01:30 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Eric Anderson) wrote:

I don't know. Once I tried this method, I stopped looking. <G>
If your method works for you, it's fine.
Barry
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Yeah, it is cool but $70??? You can make a lot of throw away ones for less and IIRC, 1/4" is the narrowest you can cut with it.
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I'm with you, Leon. The scrap-made pusher that moves both the waste and the cutoff through the blade is about the best thing going. It's what the expensive one is imitating.
My left hand holds the curved featherboard which keeps the whole snug up to the infeed.

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