Question about Teflon tape for air compressors

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A few months ago I bought a portable air compressor, and it came supplied with a roll of teflon tape. When assembling all of the various couplers/hoses/tools, I found that I needed to use copious amounts of that tape on all the threads in order to get anything to hold pressure. So far, so good.
This morning I was reading a review of a large Porter Cable compressor on Amazon, and the reviewer made the following statement regarding a leaking connector:
"After depressurizing the tank, I removed the factory compound from the threads and put on fresh joint compound (teflon tape is a no-no for air applications)."
So my question is, why is Teflon tape a bad idea for compressors? It's worked like a charm for me so far.
Thanks in advance.
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wood snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (in snipped-for-privacy@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com) said:
| So my question is, why is Teflon tape a bad idea for compressors? | It's worked like a charm for me so far.
Little 'threads' of Teflon probably won't help air tools work better.
That said, I'll confess that I used the tape for the majority of my tool and hose couplings.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
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On 11/19/2005 10:17 AM Morris Dovey mumbled something about the following:

That works both ways for tape and dope. If improperly applied, both can allow pieces of tape or dope into the system and clog up air tools. Tape is easier to apply without allowing it into the system than is dope.
--
Odinn
RCOS #7 SENS BS ???
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Morris Dovey said:

As do I, but I am careful to wrap the tape carefully to avoid having any tape extending into the air pathways. I also wrap in a direction that makes insertion tighten the wrap, rather than loosen. I usually peel the excess from the fitting when done - but I'm kind of anal...
I also cover my air inlets, insure there is no dirt in the coupler before connecting a tool, and oil my tools regularly.
I have never heard of any chemical reactions that would cause failure of either the compressor, hose or tools. But I could be in error. I would be interested in seeing reputable evidence supporting the magazine writer's phobia.
FWIW,
Greg G.
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Greg G. said:

Never mind - I now notice you said "Amazon" --- 'nuf said.
Greg G.
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While we are on this subject............. how much do I need to libricate my air tools for woodworking? I do all the same things you do Greg, cover inlet ports etc. My regulator bit the dust and I sprang for a new regulator, filter & lubricator. Got a good deal. Anyway I have always oiled my automotive style D/A sander about once a day (few drops) then ran it with a rag around the exhaust, until no oil was coming out, to protect my wood from oil. I did a google search and did not find any useful info. I am thinking about leaving the lubricator run dry cuz I think if the air hose gets saturated with oil......you will always have some oil coming out of it. Not good for woodworking. What say ye? Thank in advance Lyndell
said:

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On Sun, 20 Nov 2005 14:40:04 GMT, "Lyndell Thompson"

I follow each manufacturer's recommendation.
Some of my tools are oil-free, like my Porta-Nails flooring nailer. Oil will quickly ruin them. Others need a drop or three daily, or even a constant source from an FRL unit in the air line.
With nailers, I've found that over oiling them can be almost as bad as not oiling them, as the extra oil gets all over the wood or woodworker.
One of the best suggestions I picked up a long time ago was to add a "literature drawer" to the shop. Manuals are stored alphabetically by manufacturer. Some of my tools don't get used that often and being able to find the manual quickly is priceless. I also staple the exploded view, purchase reciept, and other info into the manual.
Barry
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Lyndell Thompson said:

Most tools come with general lubricating schedule advise in the manual. I use a couple/several drops in brad nailers per brad strip, and 5 or so drops in a framing nailer per slide load. A disc sander would get several drops every few hours of use. Pneumatic air tools such as impacts wrenches and ratchets use far more. The tool's sound changes subtly when in need of oil - but waiting till that point is probably problematic. If the tool hasn't been used in a while, I generally add a drop of two more than usual the first time.
I used a dedicated line lubricator with automotive tools, but would never do this with woodworking tools. Some are oil-free, they need varying degrees of lubrication, and subsequently using the hoses and such for finishing is out of the question - for me.
Of course, finishing requires clean air, and there are filters and moisture traps available for use. Clean hoses are also necessary. Even using the air for such pedestrian tasks as blowing dust off a sanded surface requires clean air.
So, it's a PITA, but I would (and do) oil tools individually and as needed. Another option is to have dual lines, one oiled, and one not. Automotive shops do a similar thing - either with segregated dedicated lines, or with 'modules' of air hose/lubricator/moisture trap/filter that can be moved about to service permanent basic air ports.
So, that didn't help you a bit, did it? <g>
FWIW,
Greg G.
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Agreed, & same here; never had a problem with it & it's convenient when making changes/mods to my setups which I do occasionally.
said: : : | So my question is, why is Teflon tape a bad idea for compressors? : | It's worked like a charm for me so far. : : Little 'threads' of Teflon probably won't help air tools work better. : : That said, I'll confess that I used the tape for the majority of my : tool and hose couplings. : : -- : Morris Dovey : DeSoto Solar : DeSoto, Iowa USA : http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html : :
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Morris Dovey wrote:

If installed properly there are no 'little threads' to get in the way. It should be installed 1 thread down from the end so there is no end overlap and 3 complete wraps in the opposite direction of the threads so it doesn't bunch up when twisted on. I've never ever had a problem using teflon tape for any thread sealing work, air, water, fuel or anything else I've used it on. John
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Morris Dovey wrote:

As do I. I ran a scuba shop for ten years in my first career, and teflon tape was commonly used throughout that industry for making high pressure air connections anywhere there wasn't already a captured o-ring. We used compression fittings a lot too.... either copper for up to 2500 psi and stainless steel for pressures up to 5-6000 psi. But we used teflon tape damned near everywhere. I never saw anyone use pipe dope for air fittings.
--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN

snipped-for-privacy@carolina.rr.com.REMOVE
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Mortimer Schnerd, RN wrote:

Its not always effective either:
http://www.ecs.soton.ac.uk/fire2005/pictures/large/pan.jpg
possibly caused by a Teflon taped thread leaking...
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On Sat, 19 Nov 2005 22:16:25 +0000, Badger wrote:

That's a pretty big fire. I'm curious why you would associate a Teflon taped plumbing connection with it. Frankly, if Teflon was involved in any sense, I'd be more inclined to believe that the source of the problem was the failure of the pipefitter to properly tighten the joint.
I probably tape a dozen or so tapered pipe joints a week (I handle machinery setup and repair for my employer) and never have one leak.
Bill
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W Canaday wrote:

Cylinder outlet valve where it was screwed into the neck of the cylinder, sealed with teflon tape...Small leak of a pyrophoric explosive gas (silane) leading toa big fire, last I heard 100,000,000 and still climbing....
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It wasn't screw in tight enough or the threads were damaged. Neither teflon tape or pipe dope are sealers, they are lubricants.

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wrote:

So it's confirmed as silane then ? Not a big surprise.
I'd always have been wary having that sort of chemistry in a building that size. Last time I worked in a fab we were a single story garden shed. The corridors creaked as you walked along them, but if we blew ourselves up at least we wouldn't disturb the neighbours.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

The "party" line is it was probably a 30KVA UPS that caught fire...
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On 11/19/2005 10:13 AM wood snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com mumbled something about the following:

The person who made that comment has no clue. Teflon tape is as good (if not better than) teflon pipe dope for air applications. If you wind teflon tape wrong, it's a no-no in any application, as it can block air/water/fuel/etc passage. If you wind it correctly, it's preferrable to teflon pipe dope.
--
Odinn
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On 19 Nov 2005 07:13:17 -0800, wood snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I'd accept the fact that PC _includes_ Teflon tape with the compressor kit that the Amazon reviewer has his/her head up the ol' arse. <G>
Barry
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Ba r r y said:

I don't dissagree with your conclusion, but by that analogy, including keys with a new car is not necessarily in the public's best interest. <g>
Greg G.
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