Question about smoothness from thickness planers

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In the past, some of the boards I've purchased for some basic woodworking projects have had "chew" marks on them. Very small and almost undetectable, but quickly seen when you stain the board. I've learned to check out the board under various angles to see the deviations so that I can make sure that I've sanded it enough to remove the chew marks (not sure if that's what they're called).
Anyway, I'm thinking of buying a portable thickness planer - looking at the Dewalt DW733, the Delta 22-580, and the Makita 2012NB. I have a reasonable selection of woods available to me in Santa Fe, but the boards are usually far too rough and the amount of sanding required would be ridiculous.
Do these portable thickness planers do a reasonable job of smoothing a rough board? Does anyone have any experience with the three models I've mentioned above?
Jack
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mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net wrote:

the wood with this planer. Tom
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"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote in

I've used the DeWalt in my neighbor's shop, and the Delta at the local adult ed shop. I've got a Ridgid TP1300 in my shop. Those are all pretty good tools.
They're best at thicknessing, even with new or freshly honed blades. There will almost always be a sanding stage afterwards, even if you've applied some seriously tuned hand plane to the surface, with most woods. For me, that's OK.
I tried a drum sander, the Performax 16-32, for a while, and sold it after six months. It did what it was supposed to do, I suppose, but not what I really thought I wanted it to do. Some of my tools are like that, after all.
Smoothing a rough board is what a thickness planer does, but there will likely be some further finishing required to get it to 'perfect' or 'done well enough' for me. Set your expectations, and you'll be OK.
Patriarch, playing with hand planes more and more...
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I have a Delta 22-560. Predeccor to the one you're looking at. With proper technique (not hard), the only finish work required after planing is a light tough with a card scraper and very light finish sand. You will appreciate having a planer. Stock thicknessed by you to your specs is far better than anything you can buy.
"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote in message

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I've seen little "divots" on the surface of some of the boards I've planed. It didn't matter which planer I was using. They all did it over time. I attributed most of the problem to either poor chip removal and the rollers then press the chips into the board surface or possibly dull blades press them into the surface. Whatever the cause they are hard to spot and sand out, especially in cherry. I haven't checked yet to see if they go away after a blade change. Maybe someone else has identified the source of the problem.
Jim
"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote in message

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I have seen them too on some particularly resinous pine, the chips were so sticky with resin that they stuck to the rollers and embossed the wood surface.

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My Delta will do that if I don't use the dust collector.

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On Fri, 9 Jun 2006 19:46:37 -0400, "Woodhead"

My observation, for whatever it's worth, is that mill marks on a thickness planer usually come from not taking enough of a bite on each pass. Even on a big Powermatic, they still appear from time to time, but they are the worst on the first pass that touches the board, where the knives are skipping along the surface rather than digging in nicely.
Overall, I'm really less than overwhelmed by the technology. Every so often they do a job that nothing else will, but they're tough to set up, extremely loud, and the knives always seem to get nicked right away. I don't intend to toss mine to the curb, but I never expect the end result to be ready for finishing without a little sanding time first.
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"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote in message

What size jointer do you have?
Darrell
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I don't have a jointer
Darrell Dorsey wrote:

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"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote in message

Okay, I kinda got that impression. If your using rough stock lumber, you'll definitely want to get a jointer first. You need to flatten and square up one side first on the jointer then run the remaining rough side through the planer to make it parallel.
Most of the lunch box planners will do a good job. I have an 8 year Delta 22-560, and it performs very well. I don't run a lot of lumber so I have the original set of blades installed. I have a spare set, but haven't found the need to change just yet. If I take my time and run the last few passes in very small increments, (say 1/4 turn on the handle), I can get a very smooth finish.
I'm gonna upgrade to a 15" in planner some day, but that will mainly be for noise issues. The induction motor will be a little quieter than the universal on the lunch box.
Darrell
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I have a planer, no jointer. Not likely to ever have one. No need.

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Darrell,
How rough does a board have to be to justify getting a jointer? The wood at the Santa Fe store seems pretty flat and I'm looking to just do small projects. Of course, even a small curvature probably makes a reasonable difference when making cabinets or dressers.
If I'm just looking at doing things no bigger than a couple feet, like boxes ... can I get away without having a jointer? Space is a premium in my workshop.
Jack
Darrell Dorsey wrote:

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"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote in message

Yes, easily.
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On Mon, 12 Jun 2006 18:39:40 -0600, "mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote:

Of course. I don't have one, and I've been doing woodworking in various forms for quite some time. Not only is it a hobby, but it's how I make a living, and in every shop I've been in, the jointer sits unused in a corner collecting dust.
That isn't to say they don't have their uses, but they are rarely a must have piece of equipment.
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So what are the steps you use for flattening rough stock? Do you find that hand planes are faster and better than a jointer?
Darrell
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On Sat, 17 Jun 2006 08:33:15 -0500, "Darrell Dorsey"

Faster and better? No. Cheaper and smaller? Yes. My standard procedure with rough lumber (though I will point out that at least 75% of my stock is S3S) is to hand plane one side, check the board for parallel faces with some winding sticks, then run it through the planer.
Truth be told, if it's not too rough I often skip the handplane and go right to the planer- it hasn't complaned yet.
As far as edge jointing goes, I just run it through the table saw. If it's warped, I tack it to a bit of mdf and run that against the fence, then flip it to rip the other side to the final dimention. A good blade and a bit of practice will give you cut edges that are ready for glue up right off the saw.
If your saw isn't very accurate for one reason or another and you need a better finish for edge jointing, just clamp the two boards that are to be jointed together, stand them on end, and shave them both with a handplane at the same time. Even if you're a little out of square, the result will be complemenary angles.
A good hand plane (or even a bad hand plane that is sharp and tuned up) is easy to use, and very portable. A jointer is easier to use, but you're never going to lug it to a jobsite to trim a door- and when you're not using it, it's an aircraft carrier collecting dust in your shop. I'm not a neander by any means, but at least in my shop, that's a bit of big iron that would probably not earn it's keep.
Of course, I reserve the right to change my mind and buy one at any time! :)
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wrote:

Note, there's hardly a tool out there you can't work around, though some people must get taken up with process and forget about time entirely. A decent jointer is too handy, and scarcely a buck and a half more expensive than the LN #7, which is why most shops have one, even when lumber is delivered surfaced and edged. It's not worth fussing.
No need to give a board parallel faces to put it through a planer. Plain and plane silly. All you need is a stable board and to let the planer do its job. Most people will do a quick high spot knock down and start the feed if they need to. Even people with jointers do this. The machine does an averaging act as it feeds. Of course, you can always stabilize boards on a sled.
Did I mention that anyone owning their own planer should have their head examined if they plane and store lumber? With a planer you make up what you need in the dimension you require on the spot. Which is why you make shorter boards, which are easier to work with, of the longer before processing.
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On Mon, 12 Jun 2006 18:39:40 -0600, "mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" <"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"> wrote:

Yes, but you really should have a hand plane or two to straighten the edges prior to running through the table saw.
-Leuf
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Yes, I've already fell victim to that problem. Right now, I have a board that is uneven on both sides. What I plan on doing is taking a nice straight guide board (like a precut 2x1 oak strip), affixing it to one side, then making my first straight cut with the straight tacked strip up against the fence. Then, the board should be ready for a simple cut on the other side with the newly cut side against the fence.
I'll check the newly cut side first and ... as you suggest ... hand plane it if necessary to ensure a nice straight cut.
Thanks!
Jack
Leuf wrote:

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