Question about shellac solvent

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George wrote:

Unless it was spectrophotometric grade, which would be very expensive, the other 5% might have included benzene.
For that matter, there are denatured alcohols sold for rubbing alcohol and shellac thinner that are 95% ethanol.
--

FF


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Reagent grade stuff is pretty pure, believe me.

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It has to be. There wouldn't be a chemistry undergrad left with enough sight to read the exam paper overwise.
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On Thu, 16 Dec 2004 23:17:08 +0000, Andy Dingley

Dad was in the Navy, just missing the first Vietnam escalation.
The buddies he keeps in contact with were another Helo pilot, and the ship's Dentist.
Guess which one had access to drinkable grain alchohol.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

enough
Non Sequitor.
AFAIK small doses of benzene do not cause blindness. (e.g. check out the meaning of 'confabulation')
--
FF


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George wrote:

did.
expensive,
alcohol
When I was in college spectrophotometric grade was pretty pure and therefor quite expensive. Reagent grade was contaminated with benzene which was a non-issue because the benzene did not interfere with typical organic chemistry class uses--which did not include getting drunk.
That is what our professor told us. Maybe they just didn't want us stealing the stuff. Or maybe your professors were social Darwinists...
--

FF


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Benzene is used to dehydrate and get higher percentage than the azeotropic 95/5.
If you want aliphatic only, makes sense to avoid benzene.
As there were no females, save nuns, (ok to date 'em, as long as you don't get into the habit) at the school, we took our "jungle juice" on the road. If the stuff hadn't been available, we would have distilled it on our own.

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snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net wrote:

Gees! The other 5 percent is WATER. You only get benzene (a trace) in the 100 percent because 100 percent is (or was) produced by distilling against benzene.
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George E. Cawthon wrote:

expensive,
alcohol
That makes sense, though I wouldn't count on all of the other 5% being water.
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Silvan wrote:

Well, it's still available here in SC, at least as of Tuesday. Bit of a drive farther than Richmond, but NC may still sell it. Joe

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On Wed, 15 Dec 2004 13:59:33 +0000, Andy Dingley

<snip>
Filter the meths through a hollowed out half loaf of bread. Colour gone, pyride gone. Drinkable. Ask any seasoned hobo. A bottle of meths is a lot cheaper than anything in the bottle store.
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Phil Hansen wrote:

Then some get so drunk they follow up by eating the bread. Or so I heard.
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Phil Hansen wrote:

That is so much BS! Drinkable, but not less toxic.
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But the bread does remove the dye put in there for taxation purposes. Farmers would do it to put farm gas in cars, or so im told by my grandfather....
George E. Cawthon wrote:

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I though this was about methanol? When was there a differentiation in taxes between farm and non-farm methanol?
If you are really talking about gasoline, I think something got lost in the translation or your grandfather was a bit dotty. Dyes are used in diesel for tax differentiation purposes, but in gas? Something is screwy about this. Pump gas for cars has been colored since I was little--yellow to red. What color would they put in farm gas? (or maybe they didn't color it?) If the bread took all the color out, what would they use to make it red like regular pump gas? And why in hell would you use bread instead of diatomaceous earth? Are we talking about the 1920s? 30s? I know it was not true in the 40s. Maybe this coloring things has something to do with oil field areas a burnable fraction was actually pumped (and stolen).
Eddie Munster wrote:

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George E. Cawthon wrote:

ISTR that Sohio gasoline in the 1970's was red, white, or blue with 'white' being undyed unleaded, red was leaded regular and blue was leaded premium.

Possibly because bread was more common or maybe because diatomaceous earth would not work? Isn't DE is a physical filtrate that will not remove dissolved substances.

Probably the story was from WWII when gasoline was rationed.
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I don't know about the gas being colored, but I do know that in the early '50s, farmers got a tax break on gasoline for "farm" use, and you could get your farm tank filled by Agway, but you were NOT supposed to use it in your auto, motorcycle, etc. I don't know as there was any actual telltale connected with it, but I know Uncle never put it in any car, except maybe a couple gallons in an emergency if someone didn't put gas in while in town, and it might not make it to town.
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Nahmie
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"Norman D. Crow" wrote: ...

Same system still in effect in all ag areas afaik.
Colored fuels came into being at least by the mid-50's (here in KS, anyway). I'm not old enough to know prior to then just how far back it actually goes. Multiple purposes--product indentification plus as in the above example tax purposes. Farm diesel is still colered differently from truck/pump/highway diesel as it is not subject to road taxes (and, depending on local jurisdiction, perhaps other fees/taxes as well). To best of my knowledge, there's so little farm gasoline these days there is no off-road available (certainly not here, anyway). For the old tractors and trucks, we buy pump gas, keep records of what is off-road (local Co-op has key pumps so we have separate farm/non-farm keys) and deduct the tax off the taxes when file.
One doson't want to be caught by the weigh station guys w/ long haul/non-farm use farm diesel! They're pretty serious about enforcement...
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Yep, they really want to know about that diesel fuel. I was still driving truck when that changeover came in the 90's. Wasn't just the weigh stations, they set up random checks all over PA just to see the color of your diesel fuel.
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The rumor (urban ledgend?) that I heard was that they assume you've been using farm fuel since you bought it. So they charge you back tax on whatever the odometer says.
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