Question about router bits

I just finished building me a real nice router table. So now I'm trying to learn all I can about router bits. I bought a nice set of 1/2 shank bits but I'm wanting something to join corners together. I see that Rockler has a 45 degree lock miter bit that would do the trick but I have a question. They have two bit sizes. A 2 3/4 dia x 1 3/16 height and a 1 3/4 x 3/4 height both 1/2 shank. My question is: What determines what thickness of wood you can use these on? I'm using mostly 1/2" stock and I was wondering if the 1 3/4 x 3/4 would work. Or do you have to match up the height of the cutting blades to the thickness of the wood when it comes to these? Any help or comments would be great. Thanks, Palmer
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The catalog should state which wood thickness ranges go with which bits. Even then you need to do some trial and error runs to set the bit height. I bought one from MLCS and got the set up block for 3/4 to go with it. But for other wood thicknesses I had to play with it until I got the right height and then I made my own set of blocks for future use.

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Did you see http://www.rockler.com/tech/53817.pdf ? The thickness of the stock can be equal to or less than the 'B' dimension (3/4" or 1 3/16") of the specific bit. (Also should also be thick enough so that one outside tail piece isn't too thin...) Note - the plastic jig thing is not required- plus it won't work for different stock thicknesses. Make a few trial cuts using your stock thickness, then save a piece when the joint fits right. That's your reference for setting up next time...
These bits require great router technique - use feather boards and hold-downs to keep the stock firmly in place during routing.
JeffB
Palmer wrote:

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Thanks for the help... I"m starting to understand

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Why not the easily made box joint now that you have a table? Other good ones include the combination rabbet/dado joint which, if you can't abide the look of endgrain. can have the minor thicknesses trimmed with a standard 45.
If you get the 3/4, because thickness is thickness, after all, you'll want to save examples of your first fiddle fit to get you close on your next attempt. Measuring is a colossal pain. If you use a good squared pushblock to make the pass and protect from tearout, make the last pass through, and save it for setup.
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