Question about hardwood for "RAISED PANEL DOORS"

Hello, Do professionals glue boards together when building a cabinet raised panel door that is more than 22"?. It would seem like it would have to be readily available specially for shops that do cabinet making. It seems that the widest hardwood that I can find is 16" and that is only in one place about 50 miles from home. If you do have to glue boards together what would be the professional way of doing it and what would be good tools to use? Sorry for all the questions.
thanks in advance for any help. Albert
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careful glue up with or without biscuits. be sure that they are FLAT when you clamp them. use cauls if you must, to keep those suckers flat.
tools? biscuit cutter, clamps, plane or jointer, TS, surface planer (optional if you have all the planes you need for flattening the doors). not to mention a router table and raised panel, rail and stile bits...
dave
Albert Lazo wrote:

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Don't forget to alternate the growth rings during the glue-up to help keep the panels flat...Tom >Albert Lazo wrote:

Someday, it'll all be over....
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Tom wrote:

Won't keep the panel flat. Will keep it from all the way acrossed the grain cupping but you'll get rippling instead. Less noticable though. Other option is to use hardwood ply - not the rotary cut but the sliced and layed up side by side. Looks like solid wood boards but much more stabile. Won't work for raised panels but ...
charlie b
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On 18 Jan 2004 06:17:45 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comEDY (Tom) Crawled out of the shop and said. . .:

also, dont clamp too tightly,,,over clamping is almost worse than too little pressure
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If the panel is made of solid wood then don't make a tight fit. Cut 1/116 smaller for expansion or your glue joints will blow apart. We've used a product called "Space Balls" in the grooves of the rails and stiles. Nothing to do with Mel Brooks though.
"Traves W. Coppock" <newsgroups-AT-farmvalleywoodworks-DOT-com> wrote in message (Tom) Crawled out of

keep the

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Window screen splines come in at least 2 sizes and compress well also.
wrote:

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Hi Dave,
Please pardon my ignorance, but what do you mean by a caul? I am finding definitions as a medical term and a bonnet worn by mennonites. Just wanting to know the context of the term in woodworking.
Thankx,
John V

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On Sun, 18 Jan 2004 07:30:07 GMT, "JohnV"
.:

a caul is a piece of scrap lumber that is clamped over the plane of the panel you are glueing, often with a slight bow to give constant contact when clamped down. using them is supposed to keep the pieces from buckling or rippling. i never have used them, but i do have a few friends that do and report great results.
Traves
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John,
this link will help, note that although not shown, if you cut 'V' notches in the caul over the join you will not have to run the risk of damage later when disassembling the jig. Another method is to place thin scrap between the glue lines to space the caul off the glue line.
http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/pdf/FWW141-044.pdf
regards,
Greg

wanting
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IF biscuits are used ensure they are NOT where cutting the raised panel will expose them.

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IF biscuits are used ensure they are NOT where cutting the raised panel will expose them.

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Ouch. I learned that one the hard way - a couple of times.
Bob

flat.
doors).
bits...
to
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would
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Thanks for the explanation everyone. Much appreciated.
John V

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Always, I would even rip down that 16" wide board and edge glue it back together depending on grain and the type of cut the stock is. When making cabinet doors my preference for cut is quartersawn for stability but when making doors you need a lot of it and it is premium lumber at the highest expense.
EJ
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On 17 Jan 2004 20:30:38 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Albert Lazo) wrote:

Professionals glue up panels all the time. It's very common. Try to get the color and grain to match. I found using the same board cut into pieces will give you the best color, since one board comes from the same tree. Try to match the grain so that the seam disappears. Use either brown or yellow carpenter's glue, whichever matches the wood best. Joint the seam so that there are no gaps and make sure the boards are absolutely flat and without a step at the seam when drying in the clamps. Biscuits help with the alignment. Put everything together dry, including the clamps, because once you apply the glue work fast before it starts to set up.
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Thank you very much for all the responses.
Albert
(Albert Lazo) wrote:

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