Question about hand planes

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I have to admit I'm one of those who has rarely used a hand plane. Every now and then I'd grab one to smooth a spot etc.
Recently acquired a Stanley 7C jointer and after tuning and sharpening the iron made a few passes over some oak. I know the iron was sharpened correctly but I was getting the shavings jammed between the blade edge and the front of the throat so that after one or two pushes, it wouldn't cut.
Ultimately determined that when I replaced the frog and tightened it down, it moved back from the opening by a steenth. Reset it to line up with the edge of the mouth and all is well.
Which brings me to the point - <g> - What is the purpose of an adjustable frog. Do you get a smoother cut with a smaller opening?
Just curious.
Vic
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On 11/5/2009 10:50 AM Vic Baron spake thus:

Yes. I'm not even sure why, but the best smoothing planes had adjustable openings so the opening could be closed as much as possible. I think it has to do with breaking up the chip; maybe someone else here can explain the exact mechanism at work here. I do know that my little block plane with adjustable mouth gives the smoothest cut of all my planes.
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David Nebenzahl wrote:

I'ts absolutely about breaking the chip. The blade digs up a chip and the cap forces it up even further. If there is nothing on the top of the chip for the cap to lever against, the chip may split farther into the wood. Setting the frog, and thus the blade, as close as possible to the front of the mouth forces as sharp a possible bending in the chip, leading to breaking of the chip. There is a tradeoff, of course. If the blade is set to cut a thick chip, but the mouth is set to pass a thin chip, the chips can't pass through the mouth and jam.
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Which is what I assume happened to me originally.
Thanx!
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On Thu, 5 Nov 2009 12:56:43 -0800, the infamous "Vic Baron"

Right, you either moved the frog and inadvertently closed the mouth, or you had the blade set too deep so the shaving was too thick for the small mouth. Adjust one or both until you get what feels like a happy medium to you, Vic.
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Yes, when I tightened the frog , I inadvertently moved it back from the opening and the result was that the blade went too deep and also changed the angle. I realigned the frog and the blade and am getting smooth shavings now.
I will say one thing though, that long 7C is a bear to push along after a while!
V
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On 11/6/2009 8:48 AM Vic Baron spake thus:

You are lubricating it by waxing the sole, aren't you?
All you need is a hunk of candle wax on your bench. Rub it on the bottom periodically. Makes a *huge* difference.
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On Fri, 06 Nov 2009 13:29:32 -0800, the infamous David Nebenzahl

Camellia oil is the traditional lube.
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On 11/7/2009 9:33 AM Larry Jaques spake thus:

So do you think that would actually be *better* than candle wax?
Might smell better, I'll grant you that. More expen$ive, though.
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On Sat, 07 Nov 2009 13:19:34 -0800, the infamous David Nebenzahl

Q: Have you ever tried to _finish_ a piece of wood which had candle wax on it? I try to keep all adulterants out of the shop area.
Nuff said?

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On Sat, 07 Nov 2009 18:27:50 -0800, Larry Jaques

So what would you consider suitable? I've just bought a new plane so this would be pertinent to me. How about Lee Valley's Dricote lubricant which I just happen to already have on hand? http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&p@951&cat=1,43415,43440
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Think of a hand plane as a potato peeler for wood.
Operates exactly the same way.
Lew
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On Sat, 7 Nov 2009 19:12:29 -0800, "Lew Hodgett"

So you're telling me that if I don't lubricate a potato peeler, I shouldn't worry about lubricating a hand plane?
I have yet to use the new low angle smooth plane because LV didn't have any A2 blades in stock and are mailing me one. Guess I'll have to use it first before I can compare its use to the old block plane I have. Then I can make a practical decision on the difference.
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snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com wrote:

I wasn't sure *what* he was telling you! :-) It did give me an odd craving for potato chips though...
I use hand planes quite a bit, and I never bother lubing the soles. I think it would probably make things a bit easier if I did, but I never find myself taking the time to even think about. Keeping the soles clean and polished is probably all that's really necessary, and I'm with Larry on not wanting to take a chance on transferring any lubricants to the wood.
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On Sat, 07 Nov 2009 21:55:11 -0600, Steve Turner

Realistically, I can't see it being much difference than using Top Cote or non silicone paste wax that everyone is always recommending for a table saw. The only difference is that with one the wood is on top and with the other it's on the bottom with the wood movement being reversed.
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wrote:

It's a Neander thing. In which case use Camellia Oil!
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LDosser wrote:

I've been using Johnson paste wax for years. It has never affected the finish. I've always used a plastic glove to apply it because I hate the feeling one gets after handling a waxy rag. I may have to check out the Camellia oil, a rag dampened with it may go on more quickly and with less fuss. I'm assuming one must treat the oil-soaked rag as one would linseed or tung oil soaked rags?
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On Sat, 07 Nov 2009 23:21:23 -0700, Mark & Juanita
I'm wondering how if any it effects the application and retention of finishing products.
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On Sun, 08 Nov 2009 01:27:18 -0500, the infamous snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com scrawled the following:

It's not very thick, planes off with the next shaving, and would probably work well with any oil-based finish. Since I always rinse (mineral spirits, lacquer thinner, or denatured alcohol) before finishing, it's not a problem even if I used a waterborne finish.
A quick rinse would likely fail to get rid of a chunk of candle wax, which is why I don't use candles.
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Larry Jaques wrote:

The wife always seems to have candles going in the house with kind of exotic foo-foo stinky or other. I try to tell her they're stealing my oxygen, but she doesn't listen. :-)
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