Question about compressed air to clean power tools

I sanded an oak book shelf today. Prior to sanding I was dealing with some serious planer marks. I used a PC 5" ROS and went from 80 to 120 to 220 grit. I removed about 98% of the marks and did a pretty good job of getting a smooth surface.
All told, I was running the sander for about 1.5 hours. After I finished, I used a small compressor to blow the dust out of the sander. It took about 5-6 cycles to completely remove all of the sawdust. (At least to the point where very little was blown out).
My question is this: Is it possible to harm the inner workings of the electric motor by using compressed air? I can picture the air pressure blowing some dust into the brushes or switches. I sprayed the air from into the exhaust port, through the pad holes, and into the vents in the sander housing.
The same question applies to a circular saw, mitre saw, and jig saw. (Which I also used compressed air to clean)
Thanks all.
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There is no other way to clean them So blow blow blow

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On Sun, 7 Dec 2003 16:19:58 -0700, "George M. Kazaka"

Yes there is, a vacuum. <g>
I don't think compressed air will hurt the sander, but it's not the only way to get out the dust.
Barry
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B a r r y B u r k e J r . wrote:

But it does leave it a lot cleaner.
UA100
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The downside to blowing tools to clean them is that dust can be driven into bearings. I still do it but try to not direct the air stream at the bearing seals.
Boden
George M. Kazaka wrote:

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There is a very small (minute/may never happen) chance that you can/will lodge some small particulate into somewhere where you don't want it but that's nothing compared to the harm done by leaving dust which pretty much guarantees a short life for the machine/tool.
UA100
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Mike wrote:

I do the same thing except that I vacuum the dust out.     mahalo,     jo4hn
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Mike wrote:

I'd be less worried about air pressure than moisture. If you don't have a moisture trap, you might blow water all over your inner electrical workings, and that might not be a good idea.
If you have a moisture trap, wouldn't worry about it. Computers are a lot more delicate than sanders or circular saws, and people use compressed air to clean out computers all the time.
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I think the greater danger is to your eyes from all the crud flying around. Wear goggles and use some care. I think that OSHA recommends (requires?) no more than 30 lbs of pressure for air cleaning operations. I can't see it doing any harm to the tool, however.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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I do it all the time, probably before eye danger is dust danger, to you or your shop 8^)
I like to spray my stuff off outside
-Bruce

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