Question about box joints - table saws.

I was thinking of getting a table saw to do box joints, but someone told me that not all saws will accept a dado of sufficient size...
Can anyone comment on this? I was planning on getting something at Sears on sale. I don't plan a real lot of use of this... so I don't plan to spend a fortune. The main use will be for building speaker cabinets for on the road use - read heavy abuse by roadys!!
Or should I instead get a router box joint and dovetail jig? I have a router already... but those jigs cost a few hundred bucks... similar to a saw.
Thanks!
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I'd think the router jig would be a quicker way to make box joints, though I've never made one. Sears sells a box joint jig much less expensive than a saw.
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"Bob Flint" < snipped-for-privacy@amplification.valve> wrote in message
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Stay away from plastic jigs for cutting with a router. Flex, bend, and the joint becomes a hole.
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Bob,
How big of box joints are you planning on making? Articles I have read on making box joints have used 1/4" - 1/2" dado cuts. A jig is pretty easy to make yourself for your miter gauge. Way cheaper than buying one of those dovetail jigs.
Nailbender

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I'm not sure how big the joint has to be... the stock will mostly by 5/8 or so pine, and the boxes will be from 1 to 3 cubic feet in volume... I don't know a lot about this stuff!! But the box has to be sturdy and vibration free. Some of this stuff will be on castors and will spend time in trucks... and rolling down stairs!!
hmmmm can I adapt my router table to some kind of jig?? I have a few books on woodworking but nothing really good...
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What a lot of people have told you - yes.
Half-inch cuts in 5/8 or 3/4 material will give you all the glue area you need.
As the router or tablesaw jigs do the joint one cut at a time, there is no limit on stock width.
You could also use a combination rabbet/dado joint with modern glue and a corner protector or two, or go the full Monte and get a locking miter..
wrote:

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Yes. I'll try to take some pics of my adjustable one and post to a.b.p.w
On Sat, 07 Feb 2004 19:30:10 -0500, Bob Flint

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Hey thanks! Hope my server gets them...
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http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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A lot of the low end saws at Sears will accept only a 1/2 inch dado blade. Check out the specs first. That being said, I've never made a box joint using anything larger than 1/2 inch joint, so it may be fine for you.
Joey in Chesapeake

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The super simple box joint jigs made by Oak Park for the router are very inexpensive. Too bad they don't have a mini video on their site. I've seen it in use, and it does work. Quite frankly, I just picked up some UHMW plastic and plan on making one myself.
They show it attached to their own router table, but you could attach it to any table with screws or possibly clamps.
Michel. www.woodstoneproductions.com

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Box joint jigs for the table saw can be made out of scrap hence you can build several different sizes for pennies. I use 2 pieces of 5/8" plywood glued back-to-back. Only down-side I can see is with longer pieces and height of ceiling. Like a previous post said, a 1/2 arbor will work for most things (although I do use a 5/8" jig from time to time) but 1/2" will give you plenty of "fingers" to glue without compromising the strength of the wood.

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10 years ago my mother-in-law worked at Sears, so when table saws when on sale, I got her to buy one for me (my money of course). I brought it home and after putting it together, I found out that it wouldn't take a ado head cutter at all. I was stunned. I took the saw back, and bought a slightly more expensive model. It too turned out to be a junky machine, but it took a ado head cutter.
I know some of the "bench top styled" machines (with stands, legs, etc.) won't take one either - and these are machines from some big-name manufactures. My advice is to go to a tool shop where they really know tools and talk to them - they'll look after you.
PS - I since got rid of that lousy craftsman - saggy steel side supports and all, and I now have a Unisaw, and it can do everything.
Brian

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Since you already have a router I'd go that route rather than buying a table saw just for this purpose. There are lots of plans for homemade jigs to help you. In other words, you don't have to buy a jig for a "few hundred bucks". Do a web search and you should find some homemade box-joint jigs for your router. If you don't have a router table, you can create a really nice one or you can get by with a piece of plywood between two saw horses and a 2x4 fence. I wouldn't spend a couple hundred on a table saw because you won't get anything decent for that price and you don't need it for what you want to do.
Since you have a router, how about using dovetails which would be even stronger and not any more difficult to make? I think you can buy a simple dovetail jig (the basic blue one that you can buy anywhere) for $50 or less.
--
Larry C in Auburn, WA

"Bob Flint" < snipped-for-privacy@amplification.valve> wrote in message
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wrote:

There is a jig on sale at Sears for $200Can that does both dovetails and box joints... I may get that since I've always wanted to make better drawers and things...
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Bob wrote: Group: rec.woodworking Date: Wed, Feb 4, 2004, 6:52pm From: snipped-for-privacy@amplification.valve (BobFlint) I was thinking of getting a table saw to do box joints, but someone told me that not all saws will accept a dado of sufficient size... Can anyone comment on this? I was planning on getting something at Sears on sale. I don't plan a real lot of use of this... so I don't plan to spend a fortune. The main use will be for building speaker cabinets for on the road use - read heavy abuse by roadys!! Or should I instead get a router box joint and dovetail jig? I have a router already... but those jigs cost a few hundred bucks... similar to a saw. Thanks! ****************************************************** I'm assuming that you have a router table or could easily make one. Why not make your own box joint jig which would cost about $5.00 for the wood? All you have to do is to go to the library for almost every woodworking book has a plan for one. I have made hundreds of box joints, using my home made jig and my Delta shaper-router. I first tried doing them with the same jig on my TS and much preferred the clean cut I got with my router bit. My last project was a dozen jewelry boxes for Christmas presents and although it was monotonous after doing the first two or three pieces they all came out perfectly. BTW, whichever method you use don't forget to use a "backer board" to prevent tearout.
Peace ~ Sir Edgar
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