Question about blades for miter saws...


Have any of you mitre saw owners used a metal cut off blade in a mitre saw designed for woodworking?
Safety is of course, a definite consideration. I'm asking if there are metal cut off blades designed for use in a standard woodworking chop saw? I expect to be cutting some metal tubing in the near future and would like to know if I need to buy a metal chop saw designed for that purpose or can I use a woodworking mitre saw and get dual duty service out of it?
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You can, however it is VERY HARD on your saw. If you need to cut some tubes, just load an old Skilsaw up with a abrasive blades and cut to your hearts content.
Dave
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So you're saying that it puts a lot of wear on the motor? Ok, that's something that didn't occur to me. I don't yet own a mitre saw or a metal chop saw, but was hoping to buy one and get use out of it in both cases. I do however, have an old B+D power saw. Thanks.
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Upscale wrote:

Hard on the motor, but not from the cutting strain. If you have a slow enough feed rate and are cutter softer metals with the proper blade, then the strain wouldn't be much more than cutting some hardwood. Abrasive dust/residue from an abrasive cutoff blade will kill your CMS. If you're planning on using an abrasive blade, it's probably a better idea to just buy a cheapo HF cutoff saw. If you're just cutting thin aluminum, you could get away with just using your carbide blade...the old one. ;)
R
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wrote:

What is the tubing made of?
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Aluminium or something similar ~ strong and light are my priorities, I haven't yet worked out my exact needs, it's going to be a little invention that I hope to market in the near future.
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wrote:

I've cut aluminum on my miter saw. Many of the standard woodworking blades are rated for non ferrous metals. I think TC & F with negative rake angle recommended. But check with some blade manufacturers
I worked in an aluminum extrusion plant where cuttoff was done with radial arm saws and skill saws. that was so long ago I don't think miter saws were invented.
Get a toilet wax seal and touch it to the blade before each cut.
Frank
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wrote in message

Aluminum can be cut with most wood cutting blades - just wax them first. You don't need an abrasive wheel for them. Just cut slow and steady. For tubing, clamp it securely as sometimes they want to spin at an inappropriate time! DAMHIKT
Dave
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I have an old B & D miter saw, pre compound angle. With an abrasive blade I have cut steel, and with a diamond blade I have cut bricks ( fireplace). The saw is still dead on and the bearings don't make noise . I wouldn't do this will the sliding Makita .
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Upscale wrote:

Aluminum should be no problem. My $88 Delta the blade was printed for wood or aluminum so I tried and it worked fine, just cut slow.
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What kind of metal? I have cut aluminum on my TS a number of times; but sure wouldn't want to go after steel.
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Aluminum, as has been said, can be cut with most woodworking blades with no problem. I've done some cutting of steel on my miter saw using an old carbide blade and it's cut just fine, but that was just a few cuts and I wouldn't want to do that with a good blade.
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wrote:

I used a 7" 4 tooth carbide blade on my Sears 10" miter saw to cut aluminum and a 10" abrasive blade to cut the steal for the trailer I built. The aluminum cuts very cleanly and the blade makes chips like sawdust. The abrasive blade on steel makes sparks and the 'chips' look like grindings. The abrasive blade wears very fast if you push the saw. Do not wear shorts, sandals, t-shirt when you do this. Do wear eye protection. This stuff comes off hot.
Pete
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Um, did you drop a zero there?

I hope you're not advocating cutting metal in the buff :-)
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wrote:

I see the guys that do straight finish cut door tacks (aluminum) all the time. Of course there are grades of aluminum (soft to fairly hard) but I don't know enough abouth that to give you any info. A good carbide blade and a slow to moderate feed rate and it should be fine. As far as wear on the saw I don't feel thats an issue either. It will drag on say 8/4 Oak a lot more than on aluminum pipe I would guess.
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