Question

Page 2 of 2  


in
You mean groove, not rabbet, right?
If the bottom is solid wood, it has to be that way to allow for expansion and contraction of the bottom pannel. The pannel should be free to move and should be allowed to expand out the back if necessary. Brads are actually pretty forgiving in this respect.
If the bottom is plywood, I would capture it on all four sides and glue it in place using the plywood to add structural strength to the drawer. IMNSHO this is one applpication where plywood is superior to solid wood.
_Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Stephen M wrote:

If it "has to be that way" why do frame and panel doors work OK? :)
I think it only done this way as a carry over from the days before plywood was available. It is pretty rare to see an old drawer with it's original solid wood bottom that is NOT cracked. Leaving the back open just makes it easier to replace or R&R. One other reason might be simply to make construction easier, though I typically dado all for sides and have neaver had any trouble with assembly.
Larry W
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

expansion
and
actually
it
IMNSHO
With a F&P door you will have typically 2 inches or so into which you can oversize your groove by 1/8" to accomodate expansion. In a 1/2" thick drawer, there isn't a whole lot left after you subtract for the groove and the expansion allowance.

I'll buy that.
-Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"C & S" wrote in message

move
Actually, the method of drawer making in question was devised to allow for ease of replacement of a drawer bottom and has little to do with expansion/contraction of wood.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 12/13/05
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

OK, I suppose, so long as it fits to a hare's breath.

Stronger which way? There are no strenuous forces pushing it back and forth, and it is well enough supported vertically in either case, even if one method might be measureably slightly stronger than another. There would have to be some considerable effort to deform the back of the drawer to prove a point, and tha simply doesn't occur naturally.
There are other more important considerations such as replacement, which has been mentioned.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I rabbet all 4 sides. I don't think I have ever even heard of anyone wanting to remove a drawer bottom, and it certainly looks more finished. Looks like we are a minority.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Toller wrote:
<<I rabbet all 4 sides. I don't think I have ever even heard of anyone
wanting to remove a drawer bottom, and it certainly looks more finished. Looks like we are a minority.<<
I think the consideration is what the drawer is fitted in. I repair a lot of kitchen drawers that are beat up pretty badly as they are overloaded with silverware, utensils, and some even put plates, etc. in them. The bottoms will bulge out until the drawer bottoms sag so much they fall out of the groove, or the drawer will not close easily, which results in the famous female "hip check" to make sure it does. I have also found that people put leaky things in them such as lamp oil, glue, solvent base cleaners, and all manner of other liquids. So replacing a drawer bottom is a good thing for them.
On the other hand, if it is the prized family heirloom Federal style highboy, probably enough care is taken in its use to ensure that the drawers are not abused.
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You are right. I just assumed we were talking about fine furniture.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I guess spills happen, but there is no way the bottoms of my drawer will bulge unless you take the drawer out, lay it on the floor, and jump on the bottom. If the bottoms had been made of 1/4" stuff and glued in, you wouldn't have nearly as much work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm with you two. Seems like if there is sufficient abuse to break the drawer bottom, you are also going to see sufficient force applied in the use of the drawer to make the brads pull loose and deform the bottom such that stuff falls out the back of the drawer.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Toller wrote...

I groove all four sides, too, for the same reasons you mention. I figure that if you ever really had to remove a bottom, you could always plough a groove through the back (down to the drawer-bottom groove) and slide the bottom out that way. But I've never needed to.
Incidentally, I don't use fasteners in drawer-boxes. (I do use them to secure false fronts). I only mention this in case someone does use a brad or two ("to hold it in place while the glue dries" :-), that they would need to exercise some care in ploughing (plowing) the groove to release the bottom.
Jim Do I get a point deduction for excessive use of parentheses? (G)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Wilson wrote:

Don't know why you would (or should) - I use more (a lot more). (G)
--
It's turtles, all the way down

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I like the "Norm" method because it provides a quick and easy way to square the drawer. Because you attach the bottom with brads along the back, you can use a square to true up the box as you put in the brads.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dr. Deb wrote:

Totally enclosed is stronger, makes the box stiffer, is slightly more difficult to assemble, but makes squaring the box easier. OTOH, it makes it somewhat more difficult to change the bottom, if needed.
I always make my bottoms totally enclosed because I won't be able to change the bottom anyway; I glue the bottom in. I don't worry about wood movement because I use plywood for the sides and the rear, and the bottom is of Masonite or plywood. I have never had a problem with drawers due to wood movement, but I also live in a fairly dry climate. If you use solid wood for those parts you would be asking for trouble if glued in.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I laminated all my plywood drawer bottoms (and shelves), doubt they'll wear or break first. Enclosed all 4 sides and glued.
-------------------- Steve Jensen Abbotsford B.C. snipped-for-privacy@canada.mortise.com chopping out the mortise. BBS'ing since 1982 at 300 bps. Surfing along at 19200 bps since 95. WW'ing since 1985 LV Cust #4114
Nothing catchy to say, well maybe..... WAKE UP - There are no GODs you fools!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.