query about Bies & Aux Fences

Folks -
I would like to make some mods to my bies fence for some of the Uni features that would be helpful...
Have any of you made a "flip down" fence (for lack of a better description) for ripping thin stock? Also, I'd like to be able to use a short fence as a cut off stop w/ the miter guage. I've used scrap and a clamp but I'd like something better. Do any of you have any recommendations for tricking out a rip fence? Like Ross Perot says....
Thanks in advance!
John Moorhead Lakeport CA
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On Tue, 06 Jan 2004 06:30:42 GMT, "john moorhead"

I've made a few "accessories" for my bies.
for starting crosscuts where I'll need repeatability I made a block right at 1 inch. held on with a clamp, but I can use the fence measure (just have to remember to add the inch...)
for tall workpieces I made a high fence. it straddles the bies and has it's own clamp built in.
sometimes I'll clamp a springboard to the fence as a hold down, though more common is a featherboard clamped to the table as a hold in.
not sure what you mean by flip down fence....     Bridger
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John Moorhead wrote:

John,
Fire away.

Let's start with the "functionality" of the "flip-down/short fence/tall fence". The tall fence for all intents and purposes will be used 99% of the time for the typical hobbyist wooddorker. The function of the short fence is for when plastic laminated (Formica) panels are trimmed. As you know the proper method is to lay up laminate oversize on your substrate, i.e., laminate hanging over the edges. With the short fence configured you then run your panel edge (substrate) against the short fence and let the laminate (Formica) ride above and below the fence.
Because of the inherent properties of thin stock (it's wily, twisty, doesn't want to behave) you should always use the tall fence. Otherwise you run the risk of the material riding over the top of the fence and spoiling your cut.

This is one of the flaws of the "as designed" Biesemeyer (1) fence. Why Delta/Biesemeyer doesn't extract it's collective head from it's collective ass I don't know. Anyway (rant off) there was once upon a time a Web page devoted to removing a stock Biesemeyer fence face (Owen Lowe?) and replacing it with UHMW. In a nut shell, it's no big thing.
The "new" HTC fence incorporates ModEez fasteners to fix their fence faces and offer spares for anyone wanting to make a modified fence face. This is a step in the right direction and can be easily done by any hobbyist wooddorker. On the other hand, you could also tap the metal tube for 1/4-20 screws and be more or less in the same place.

Check this months Popular Wooddorking. Jim Tolpin has an article on making modifications.
(1) Despite my rant I do believe Sir William of Biesemeyer has a seat in Heaven for whenever he needs to use it.
UA100
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Dear Woodworkers: I also have the Biesemeyer fence and I wanted the capabilities to attach a fence for dadoe and other uses. I purchased the rare earth magnets from Wood Craft and drilled several recessed holes to accommodate the magnets into the side of the fence. I then glued the magnets into place,and attached small pieces of metal recessed into my wooden auxiliary fences, and I am able to attach and remove fences, and cut-off stops very easily. Just be sure to mount the metal pieces high enough to avoid blade contact.
Good Luck, Mike from American Sycamore
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Check out Jim Tolpin's book "Table Saw Magic" - More tricks than you can shake a stick at...

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