Quarter sawn lumber explained

For a few of us that need a simpler explanation of quarter sawn lumber and why it is more expensive,
This method is labor and time intensive.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VvUPJPFg4wM

And done another way in a more wasteful manner.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VvUPJPFg4wM

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On Wed, 5 Feb 2014 14:40:51 +0000 (UTC), Doug Miller

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On 2/5/2014 9:23 AM, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.com wrote: ...

That's so altho it's not a very large percentage...it's computable from log size depending on how much diagonal one wants to allow in the discernment of "quartersawn" or not.
Need GMO trees that grow square corners and concentric square growth rings to maximize yield... :)
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"dpb" wrote in message

I speculated here some time back that the day of adhesives in woodworking would end... grow the shapes you need and let them grow together into finished products. ;~)
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On 2/5/2014 12:53 PM, dpb wrote:

By "log size" I refer to the fact it's a fixed ratio assuming the hypothetical round trunk, and a given maximum allowed curvature, not that it is actually a variable percentage by the physical size except in total volume.

Once't upon a time I recall there was a flurry of work to try to grow "square" melons and such to make shipping more efficient. I don't recall having heard much about it for a while... :)
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On 2/5/2014 8:40 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

Thanks! sorry

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uZoG42yr_9A

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On Wed, 05 Feb 2014 08:15:24 -0600, Leon wrote:

They touch on it a little in the video, it requires a much higher quality log. The reason for this is very little high grade is extracted from the center of an oak log. Hence the origin of the grade FAS, indicating First And Second cut of a log.
Generally when flat sawing grade oak lumber the core material is dropped out as a 7x9, 6x8, 6x6 etc. The lumber goes to grade markets and the cants for ties, dunnage, resawed for pallets or a thousand other uses.
In quarter sawing the mill has to deal with a lot of low grade lumber from the core and/or purchase higher grade logs, either choice runs the cost up.
Industrial green hardwood markets consume far more hardwood than the grade lumber markets. The demand for railties greatly enhances the price of flooring.
basilsik
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