quadrilinear Posts

I am interested in doing some Arts & Crafts projects. I would be using quadrilinear Posts. The thing that worries me is everything I read talks of gluing 4 boards around a center post, making what looks & feels like a solid post capable of taking mortises etc, but why doesn't the center post cause some failure in the glued post? I would have thought seasonal movement on the internal post would exert pressure on the miter locked sides?
Chris
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of
solid
Hmmm. Quarter to quarter, face to face grain should be a movement wash - and a post that looked real. Even where the figure were less than perfect, it may be that it would compress the interior rather than blow the glue line.
Now the miters would open and close with the seasons, of course, just as they do in a frame.
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"Chris" wrote in message

of
solid
Stickley basically used two methods that have stood the test of time, so you might want to consider how he did it instead:
Veneering the flat sawn faces with quarter sawn stock; and gluing together four quarter sawn pieces cut in a trapezoidal shape, with notches, and that left a hollow center, unlike your description of a "post" for a center.
FWW (Taunton Press) has a book out called "In the Craftsman Style" which gives a good description of both, including a way to do the latter using modern router bits. Might want to check your library for a copy.
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wrote:

In almost every case, a simple solid post does the job. You can use the assembled post technique to make thick posts from thin timber, but it's rarely necessary. I'd only do it if I had really nicely figured timber, the completed post was visible, and it was for a client who understood what quarter sawing means.

I've not heard of that one. Usually it's four sides, and some sort of lock mitre cut to hold them in place for gluing. No centre at all.
There's also the approach of simply veneering the tangential surfaces, but use a veneer you sawed yourself from the same timber. Obviously this doesn't help you make thicker posts from thin stock.
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On Sun, 13 Feb 2005 00:49:52 +0000, the inscrutable Andy Dingley

Since the vast majority of people don't know the difference between a vinyl picture glued to termite barf and a nice piece of wood, that would work out to "fairly seldom", huh?

Ditto here. I think I prefer the Marks method below.

David Marks uses QS veneer on the 2 plainsawn sides of each leg. I'll try this shortly. It's time to fume some oak...
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On Sat, 12 Feb 2005 19:03:05 -0800, Larry Jaques

"Roman Orgy Today. First served, First come." -- History of the World, Part I
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On Sun, 13 Feb 2005 16:03:49 GMT, the inscrutable igor

Finally, a person who could translate that and find a grin.
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