Quadralinear Post Question

Hi,
I'm thinking about building a mission style rocker for my wife. The plan is to use quadralinear posts and 1/4 sawn oak for asthetics. Fine for the two front posts, but how is the same thing accomplished with the rear (back) posts? They're angled, making quadralinear construction a difficult proposition at best. I can't find any references to indicate if period pieces used quadralinear fronts and solid backs or quadralinear all the way around. Any suggestions?
-Chris-
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You could either veneer the visible non-figured sides or just put the figured faces on the sides since the front will be partially covered (depending upon your design) and the back is usually not viewed.
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Sam Krenov wrote:

Thanks. I'll give it a thought.
-Chris-
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Personally, I would not take it into consideration.
I do quite a bit of work with QSWO, and look at many originals in the process, and can't recall seeing a real "period piece" that did take it into consideration ... and rarely a modern, commercial piece that does.
To me, a leg/post with the same face grain pattern on all sides does not look right. While this is undoubtedly a matter of personal taste and opinion, I do think there is too much emphasis on this aspect of furniture making today, mainly by dint of "how to" articles in magazines the past few years.
Just my tuppence ...
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Swingman wrote:

[snip]
Good points. I'm partial to the look, though. But, more importantly for a gift for my wife, my wife likes the look. :)
Thanks for the input.
-Chris-
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Yep, I've done it myself. Granted, Stickley did it more than other purveyors of the Craftsman style, but that is not to say it was something done as a matter of course by everyone of that period and style.
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If you really want to do this, you can use a Lock Miter bit to make it pretty simple. They have both large and small versions that cover various thicknesses of stock.
To assemble lock mitered pieces, or even simple mitered pieces, lay a few pieces of tape across the table with the sticky side up (or stickley side). Then lay the four edge mitered pieces across the tape with the edges butted. Put glue in the joints, and then roll it up like a sushi roll (or a jelly roll if you prefer sweets).
The Craftsman era builders did do this on some pieces with larger posts and used a variety of methods from veneer to hollow mitered to miters around a center post (the hardest to do and least recommended in my opinion).

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That was his plan for the front but the rear has a dog-leg and he wanted to know how to handle the dog leg.
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Ahh, I thought maybe I wasn't following the question 100%. I hate it when I'm not as smart as I think I am.

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