Q: Reapplying Lacquer


Can I reapply lacquer over the top of previously lacquer'd cabinets? I would need to sand them to rough it up first, right?
I have a neighbor whose kitchen cabinets are deteriorating in some places where they get water splashed on them (mostly around the dishwasher). In looking at them, I can see places along the beading profile where the lacquer was not applied very well. My plan is to clean up the doors, then sand them with 320-grit to rough up the surface, then reapply lacquer using an aerosol-type lacquer product from General Finishes.
Does anyone see a problem with this? I'm going to do some tests on the back sides of a door first though because I've never used lacquer before.
TIA,
Mike Dembroge
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One of the nice things about that high VOC/Stinky lacquer, is that the solvent in nitro-cellulose lacquer will dissolve already dried lacquer. One of the tests I perform in order to establish if I'm dealing with lacquer or shellac, is a bit of either alcohol or lacquer-thinner.
Generally, lacquer over lacquer will stick like dog-snot to a screen-door.
A couple of caveats and warnings: Make sure there isn't anything nasty/waxy, like Pledge, floating around on top of what you're about to spray. A 400-grit scuff is not 'over-doing it'. That action will rough up and clean as well, so still a good idea. ScotchBrite green pads are pretty good at getting lacquer ready for a squirt. Also...some modern-day catalysed lacquers do not dissolve quite as readily as the more conventional stuff.
hth r
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snip

snip

Some more warnings. Clean the areas to refinish with a solvent to clean and 'dewax' the area. Then wipe the area down with denatured alcohol to get rid of solvent residue. Then scuff/ fine sand. Wipe the area clean - more alcohol. Then apply the laquer.
You state that you've never used laquer before, so;
Mask everything - the laquer overspray will travel a long way and it's lots and lots of work to get it off. Ask at the local paint expert place about the brush/wipe on laquer stuff. You will stink up the house with the laquer. Windows and doors wide open helps. Doing the job in the garage/work shop is better if you can.
.
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Thanks for his info. This is the type of info I was looking for.

Yes, I have a small garage/shop and that's where I'll be doing the work. I also have a 6x10 box utility trailer that I use for temp storage and deliveries. I may try to convert that to a make-shift spray booth. I think it would work out great.
Thanks again.
Mike
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Can you spray outdoors? Laquer vapor is potentially explosive in a confined room.
On Mon, 24 Apr 2006 06:48:37 GMT, "Mike Dembroge"

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On Mon, 24 Apr 2006 04:55:12 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@vcoms.net wrote:

You can spray anywhere even indoors. Good ventilation is a good idea. You can spray outside with little or no wind - be prepared to have all tha junk blowing in the wind on the wet parts you just coated
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Yes ______________
No. Lacquer is like shellac...the solvent in the material means additional coats melt into existing ones.
--
dadiOH
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Thanks for the help gentlemen. I appreciate it.

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I agree with all the previous, but one warning. Kitchens are very greasy places and you never find that place where a little grease was hiding until the new finish fails (lacquer, paint, whatever) about 4 to 6 months later. I would recomend a serious degreasing with something like Behlens De-waxer solvent or something like that.

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Thanks Max. I appreciate the info.
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Mike:
The beauty of lacquer is that you can burn a new coat into existing coats. Forget the sandpaper though - at least as far as roughing up the surface goes. For areas that are not chipped or otherwise uneven, simply take a 3M pad to the existing finish. You can use scouring powder to roughen up the surface as well. I do that for large areas and it works well to ensure a nice even scratch to the existing finish. Just sprinkle it on a wet 3M pad and go for it. You'll end up with a really nice, even, dull finish.
If you have finish damage in the existing finish, then consider feathering out the damage with a very fine paper. Put the 320 away though. Use 600 and take you time. By all means - put the 320 away for scruffing the existing finish. That's way too coarse for scruffing a lacquer finish.
The aerosol finishes can be fine. Just be aware that they shoot too much pressure for the amount of material they distribute. It's easy to get an overspray look to your work. Experiment on some scrap and find out exactly what rate of application you're going to need. Hold the can 6-12" away from the surface and shoot a continuous spray - no spritzes. Like I've said here more times than most guys probably care to see - practice so that the finish goes on as if you were spreading a clear plastic film over the surface.
The beauty of lacquer is that you don't have to shoot the whole thing. You can do an area a little bigger than the bad area, and then buff everything to blend.
--

-Mike-
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