PVC or Metal Dust collection???

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Hello all. Well i'm going to ask a question tat I know has been around but I'd like to see if there are any new opinions.
Should I use PVC or Metal ducting for my shop dust collection. And has anyone used the longranger automatic blast gates from Penn State Industies?
Here's my situation. Small shop, about 15 x 14. I want to hook up my miter saw, TS, Router Table and have a couple of optional hookups for thing like sanding and my Drill press. I just got a small 1hp Delta DC. Didn't see the need for much more. I'll only be running one tool at a time.
I've read all the pros and cons about PVC and Metal ducting. PVC cheap but Grounding?? Metal no grounding. So what should I use? I would like to us PVC. What about a mixture of both.
And I want to use the Longranger automatic bast gates. Are they any good. Just seems like it would make life easy.
I'll post some pictures when its all set up.
Thanks
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wrote:
|Hello all. Well i'm going to ask a question tat I know has been around but |I'd like to see if there are any new opinions. | |Should I use PVC or Metal ducting for my shop dust collection. And has |anyone used the longranger automatic blast gates from Penn State Industies? | |Here's my situation. Small shop, about 15 x 14. I want to hook up my miter |saw, TS, Router Table and have a couple of optional hookups for thing like |sanding and my Drill press. I just got a small 1hp Delta DC. Didn't see the |need for much more. I'll only be running one tool at a time. | |I've read all the pros and cons about PVC and Metal ducting. PVC cheap but |Grounding?? Metal no grounding. So what should I use? I would like to us |PVC. What about a mixture of both.
My Jet DC-1100 is somewhere between Tool Crib and my house. When it gets here, I'm plumbing with 4" PVC drainpipe. Four-inch metal vent pipe is about twice the cost, which is reasonable, but the fittings, tees, elbows, etc are outrageous.
FWW Magazine No. 153 had an article on the static discharge concerns with plastic pipe. Bottom line, it isn't a concern. Creating sparks by metal-to-metal contact in a pile of saw dust is more of a concern.
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Ben wrote:

Why will it need to be grounded?
UA100
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This issue is fueled by lots of emotion and little rational thought.
I maintain that expolding PVC dust collectors, and 'grounding' of PVC is an urban myth with no basis in fact.
Nobody can provide a firsthand evidence of any such event, although those who hold a low credibility threshold can recite stories from a brother in laws cousin who overheard a conversation at AA.
What I find absurd is the thought that you can ground PVC. PVC is an insulator. You cannot ground an insulator. Do you bother grounding the wire insulation in your shop? No, because you already know you cannot ground an insulator.
The biggest danger of fire a dust collection system poses is hitting a nail with your table saw or other power tool and having the hot metal fragment(s)smoulder in the dust bin. If you are concerned about fire danger you will empty our dust collection system every time you knock off for the day.
I would be happy to be proven wrong. But you will not prove me wrong with a strongly opinionated post or with fourth hand anecdotes.

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Some people complain about the static buildup. I tell them to do the same thing with the static from the DC as they do with the static from their wife, kids, dog, cat, etc, during the winter heating months. They must do something. Do the same thing.
LRod
Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999
http://www.woodbutcher.net
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To the OP; Pay no attention to what those other guys are saying. Insulator Schminsulator. Contrary to what these know-it-all types tell you, for less than 20 bucks and a couple of hours of your time, you _can_ ground your PVC duct work.
You'll need: Box of #10 rubber bands. SillyPutty<tm>, in assorted colors    (The starter 6-pack set works fine, you won't need much.) 1 2-foot long piece of 1/2" PVC. 1 Pair pantyhose.
1.) Tie several dozen rubber bands together. Don't cut them and tie them together, loop each one through the next so that your final rope of rubber bands has a loop at each end. Don't fark this up. The loops are critical.
2.) Attach one end to your PVC ductwork with the SillyPutty<tm>. Now you see why you need the loop. SillyPutty<tm> isn't worth a damn at securing a single string, but with a loop in the end the SillyPutty<tm> will have more grabbinessability to really hold thatrubber to the PVC. I recommend the yellow SillyPutty<tm>, others swear by the green. You may find the red works best in your application. Whichever one you find works best for you, be sure to post pictures on ABPW.
3.) Bang a 2-foot long piece of 1/2 inch PVC pipe into the ground, preferably as close to your compost pile as possible. The nitrogen in the compost helps attract the stray electrons that are about to be ionized. (I'll explain the how of this in another post, it's beyond the scope of this one.) Attach the other end of your rubber band line to the PVC. Since SillyPutty<tm> isn't waterproof, you'll need to secure this end, (the"compost" end) to the PVC pipe by running one leg of the pantyhose through the loop in the rubber band. Run it up to the crotch. Run it up to the crotch. I liked the way that sounded so I said it twice, but you only have to do it once. No extra electrical discharge will occur by running it up to the crotch more than once. Finally, wrap each leg of the pantyhose around the PVC pipe several times and then tie the legs together securely, squeezing the rubber band as hard as possible to the PVC pipe. The more tightly you squeeze the rubber band to the PVC pipe, the more Ohms your electrons can amp down into the ground on their way to the compost pile.
Although bare-bones in nature this is, in essence, a perfectly grounded PVC system! Don't be too concerned if you don't have a compost pile. The nitrogen ionic voltage transfer won't be as efficient without one, but your grounding system will still work just as well as if you did nothing at all. And remember...
post pictures.
Michael
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You really don't know what you're talking about. There's no such thing as grounding a non-conductive surface. You can make yourself believe that you're doing such a thing, but you're not. If it were true, we wouldn't have such basic electronic components as a capacitor.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Larry Bud) wrote in

LOL
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Best regards
Han
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Oh well, hook, line, and sinker! But I HAVE read completely serious websites which claim you can "ground" a PVC system...
I hate all of you :-)
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Sure you can (as far as static electricity is concerned) but the real question is do you need to?

LOL
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If at first you don't succeed, you're not cut out for skydiving




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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Larry Bud) wrote:

Misuse of the word. If they said "drain static build-up so you don't zap yourself bumping into the pipe" then they'd be OK.
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Larry Bud wrote:

Somebody get the pliers, this hook's in deep :-)
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Sunderland, MD
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On Wed, 07 Jan 2004 07:14:29 GMT, Michael Baglio

You've obviously never been around my wife in the winter...uh, never mind.
LRod
Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999
http://www.woodbutcher.net
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Thanks Michael, I'm still looking for the silly putty.
Daniel
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"Michael Baglio

<snip>
I can't find "Silly Putty". Will "Plumber's Putty" (non-union) work if I dye it different colors? ;-)
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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wrote:

it will work as long as you stand there and tell it bad jokes. as soon as you stop, your dust collector will explode.
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wrote:

Yes, but "Plumber's Pantyhose" won't. The crack in the back lets out too many static ionomers. And stuff.
Michael "SillyPutty<tm>. It isn't just for breakfast anymore."
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Having just gone through this 8 months ago, I'm pretty well informed. Oh boy, here we go. First, if someone talks about grounding PVC, they don't know anything about electricity, as you can't ground a non-conductive surface. So all "grounding" PVC does is empty your wallet and clog your pipes.
2nd, you'll hear claims that static discharge is an explosion hazard, even though nobody can find one single source of STATIC causing an explosion. You'll hear all sorts of claims, but when you dig deep into them, you'll find that it wasn't static at all that caused the fire, but something else.
You'll also hear claims that you NEED to buy that expensive spiral pipe, because a home dust collector will collapse the cheap snaplock pipe that the Borg sells. Poppycock. It doesn't even come close to collapsing. I have the Jet 1100 and it works great with the cheap stuff you buy for $6 for 6'.
Now, I chose the snaplock metal pipe because it's light, easy to work with, and I ended up fabricating my own Y's. Don't blow your money on $30 Y pipes. It's ridiculous for what they get for those. I used 6" for my my line, and fabricated 6x6x4" Ys for each machine, using a manual aluminum blast gate.
In addition, using the metal pipe allows you to use those great adjustable elbows that the borg sells as well. You don't want to elbow anything to a 90 deg angle, you want to keep all bends to 45 degrees. Tape it all up with aluminum tape, and you'll have a solid dust collection system.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Larry Bud) wrote:

Almost correct. Two 45's will have the same resistance as a single 90 with the same bend radius. The issue is really long radius vs. short radius. If you mean "don't make more than a 45 degree bend with one adjustable elbow" or "use two elbows to make a 90 degree bend" then you're correct.
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In article

Let me fine-tune that comment a bit. If you're using 45's you'll often get a side benefit of being able to shorten the total pipe length, so you will get less resistance, but for a different reason.
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