Protractor


Does anybody know where I can get a protractor with large numbers?
TIA ____________________ Bill Waller New Eagle, PA
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Go to Amazon.com and search protractor. You'll get a large selection.

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Large numbers as in 3,278,934,821? Nope. Sorry.
--

-Mike-
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Bill Waller wrote:

Better picture here on page 5 http://www.aph.org/catalogs/pdf/family2002/aphfamily03_05_12.pdf Joe
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Large number for legibility or large number behinD the decimal point?
THE choice for visually challenged is the Bosch digital read-out protractor. I have one..and if you can't reads those digits, you shouldn't be anywhere near a saw.
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Bill:
Don't know what you want the protractor for. But take a look at Lee Valley item # 05N66.01 Veritas Bevel setter. Even my eyes can set a bevel gage to 4.5 degrees with this thing.
I got one last Xmas and I love it.
Phil

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I discovered the perfect protractor.
I drew a polar array in AutoCAD. 360 lines emanating from a common point. Each line represents a degree. Believe me when I say it doesn't matter how large the circle is, the lines are accurate. i.e equally spaced, even when printed.. Every 5 lines is a solid line, the 3 in between hidden lines. At 22.5, 45, 67.5, 90, etc... are center lines. This helps you to see. the center doesn't go to a messy blob. Terminate in a small circle, maybe a dollar size. But alternate where you terminate each type of line i.e. the center, the solids
It requires a little flip/flop during alignment, and guessing and erasing with a pencil mark, but you can get it PERFECT. No other method/tool even comes close. You can mark your angle/line/point anywhere within the size of the printout. You can also cut a slit with a razor along one line, say 90 degrees, so you can put your pencil through it. Just adjust the starting point, or make a calculation.
I printed some on my inkjet on mylar paper that I cut to 8-1/2" x 11', from scraps from a printers shop roll, so my circle was a max of 8-1/2" side to side, and 11" top to bottom. Just let it dry. If you go to a high-end printers shop, the maximum side to side mylar is 36", but length is infinite! And their $250, 000 OCE printers' ink is heat activated and permanent
You can make many types of them, and print many, slice them up, cut them... Mylar is see-through, almost indestructible plastic. printing is not expensive if you need these. I don't know if you can buy it Office Depot. You wouldn't believe how incredible this method is!
I'd love to hear back anytime if someone tries this and likes it. Believe me, if you go through with it, you will be laughing at the discovery you made.
You can take the drawing to the reproduction (copy)shop. They do literally millions of .dwg files! CAD in a "copy" shop is a majority of the profit. Astley -Gilbert Reproductions (Canada) for instance. I did this a while ago. If anyone wants my file , I think I got it on floppy some where. Can I put a .dwg or .dxf in a newsgroup?
-
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I discovered the perfect protractor.
I drew a polar array in AutoCAD. 360 lines emanating from a common point. Each line represents a degree. Believe me when I say it doesn't matter how large the circle is, the lines are accurate. i.e equally spaced, even when printed.. Every 5 lines is a solid line, the 3 in between hidden lines. At 22.5, 45, 67.5, 90, etc... are center lines. This helps you to see. the center doesn't go to a messy blob. Terminate in a small circle, maybe a dollar size. But alternate where you terminate each type of line i.e. the center, the solids
It requires a little flip/flop during alignment, and guessing and erasing with a pencil mark, but you can get it PERFECT. No other method/tool even comes close. You can mark your angle/line/point anywhere within the size of the printout. You can also cut a slit with a razor along one line, say 90 degrees, so you can put your pencil through it. Just adjust the starting point, or make a calculation.
I printed some on my inkjet on mylar paper that I cut to 8-1/2" x 11', from scraps from a printers shop roll, so my circle was a max of 8-1/2" side to side, and 11" top to bottom. Just let it dry. If you go to a high-end printers shop, the maximum side to side mylar is 36", but length is infinite! And their $250, 000 OCE printers' ink is heat activated and permanent
You can make many types of them, and print many, slice them up, cut them... Mylar is see-through, almost indestructible plastic. printing is not expensive if you need these. I don't know if you can buy it Office Depot. You wouldn't believe how incredible this method is!
I'd love to hear back anytime if someone tries this and likes it. Believe me, if you go through with it, you will be laughing at the discovery you made.
You can take the drawing to the reproduction (copy)shop. They do literally millions of .dwg files! CAD in a "copy" shop is a majority of the profit. Astley -Gilbert Reproductions (Canada) for instance. I did this a while ago. If anyone wants my file , I think I got it on floppy some where. Can I put a .dwg or .dxf in a newsgroup?
-
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pardon me, thats twice I tried to make this a new post, not a reply. Lets try again? How can this be possible?
-
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I discovered the perfect protractor.
I drew a polar array in AutoCAD. 360 lines emanating from a common point. Each line represents a degree. Believe me when I say it doesn't matter how large the circle is, the lines are accurate. i.e equally spaced, even when printed.. Every 5 lines is a solid line, the 3 in between hidden lines. At 22.5, 45, 67.5, 90, etc... are center lines. This helps you to see. the center doesn't go to a messy blob. Terminate in a small circle, maybe a dollar size. But alternate where you terminate each type of line i.e. the center, the solids
It requires a little flip/flop during alignment, and guessing and erasing with a pencil mark, but you can get it PERFECT. No other method/tool even comes close. You can mark your angle/line/point anywhere within the size of the printout. You can also cut a slit with a razor along one line, say 90 degrees, so you can put your pencil through it. Just adjust the starting point, or make a calculation.
I printed some on my inkjet on mylar paper that I cut to 8-1/2" x 11', from scraps from a printers shop roll, so my circle was a max of 8-1/2" side to side, and 11" top to bottom. Just let it dry. If you go to a high-end printers shop, the maximum side to side mylar is 36", but length is infinite! And their $250, 000 OCE printers' ink is heat activated and permanent
You can make many types of them, and print many, slice them up, cut them... Mylar is see-through, almost indestructible plastic. printing is not expensive if you need these. I don't know if you can buy it Office Depot. You wouldn't believe how incredible this method is!
I'd love to hear back anytime if someone tries this and likes it. Believe me, if you go through with it, you will be laughing at the discovery you made.
You can take the drawing to the reproduction (copy)shop. They do literally millions of .dwg files! CAD in a "copy" shop is a majority of the profit. Astley -Gilbert Reproductions (Canada) for instance. I did this a while ago. If anyone wants my file , I think I got it on floppy some where. Can I put a .dwg or .dxf in a newsgroup?
-
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no wait, 15/30/45, etc. are center lines!! I was wondering about that .5 degree.
I was trying to use the same subject name.
-
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You should stop talking to yourself.
Try here:
http://www.incompetech.com/beta/plainGraphPaper /
Or, there are simpler, much cheaper CAD programs that will do this as well.
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I've never seen one with a number larger than 180.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net (in jOCdnRyn9ufrjYjZnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@charm.net) said:
|| Does anybody know where I can get a protractor with large numbers? || <...snipped...> | | I've never seen one with a number larger than 180.
I have one that goes all the way to 360 :-)
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
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large numbers for use by a visually impaired school student. I ended up creating it using Generic Cadd and giving it to my wife to take to work to copy onto transparency stock.
She works in the Visually Impaired/Blind support program in Allegheny County (PA). I, being visually impaired myself, am called upon on occasion to come up with ideas to achieve accessibility for some of the students. ____________________ Bill Waller New Eagle, PA
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