Printing/stamping on wood - in color.

So I've put brands on wood using branding irons, but I'd like to try to do a similar type thing with color. What I'm thinking is some sort of metal stamp that can be inked and pressed into the wood, leaving it slightly indented. I've seen antique boxes for sugar and butter and stuff that look like this was how it was done. Does anyone know of a maker of stamps that are made for this? I'm not even sure I'm using the right terminology. IAE, thanks. JP
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I cannot imagine an inked metal stamp that could make an indent and not squeeze out the ink. I've seen thing stamped and t hen silk screened though.
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I'm following the trail of reasoning by imagination. But this seems possible to me, depending on the composition of the metal stamp, the dye/ink/pigment used, along with the softness and absorptivity/porosity of the wood. Googling with a mix of terms didn't win any prize. The people apt to certainly know are in the packaging industry.
One simple way to avoid using a stamp as a color applicator is to stamp your logo, paint the area, sand the surface and--shazam, the color is only in the recesses. That's a dead simple method.
Turning to other distinctive ideas within reach and, it seems within the scope of your intent, polymer resin, sealing wax or other colored compounds can be poured or pushed into cut, carved or stamped designs with very entertaining result. Obviously, more effort is involved. But the processes can be streamlined to a production clip if you fancy the end attained.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
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It would work fine. Sqeezing out the ink is like sqeezing out glue. Doesn't happen.
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.
Thanks for the replies. This is more of a "I'd like to try" than a "this must be done by Friday" kinda thing. My guess is that the rather large and complex stamp would be quite expensive, not to mention the mechanism to press and indent the surface. I was thinking something like a book press with a stamp on it that I could roll with ink or press into a large ink pad prior to pressing the wood. I dunno... JP
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On Sat, 19 Feb 2011 18:33:59 -0800 (PST), Jay Pique

Try "stamping press", Jay. Metalworking tool modified for wood. For pine, a drill press would probably do after you make the die.
-- Happiness is not a station you arrive at, but a manner of traveling. -- Margaret Lee Runbeck
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The secret, I think, would be to etch the face of the stamp, so it would pick up the ink. Something along the lines of copper-plate etching. Haven't tried it, but that's what I'd try. Ed
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I don't think you'll find a one step process for indenting and applying color(s). If it's only one color, then it's just paint in an indent, no?
What's your thinking on using color? It adds a lot of complexity and unless the 'label' was pretty big the odds of it coming out messy and/ or not worth the effort are pretty high.
I believe Stickley changed from branded furniture to metal tags attached with brads. If you're looking for permanence, attach the brass tag with brass screws and strip the heads. It'll give it that professional look. ;)
R
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JP, Hot stamping is used on a variety of materials - here's a Wiki article on it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hot_stamping Kerry
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You could go with hot stamping, even hot stamping with foil colors, but you could only use one color, more than one would be difficult to keep in register. If this is a limited number of items try the material they make to transfer to Tee shirts, printed in ink jet and color laser printers, it is transferred by heat and pressure. An iron could do it, and you would have a full color label printed on the wood surface which could be varnished overtop.
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