Printing Full Size Drawings

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Fri, Sep 28, 2007, 5:19pm (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (FrankDrackman) doth query: Does anyone print full size drawings of their plans? <snip>
Who needs plans? My questions are: What do you mean by 'full size drawings'? And, do you mean 'your' plans, that you drew; or plans made by someone else, that you bought? If you already have plans, why would you feel the need to print them? Or, do you mean print them the actual size of the finished product?
Not being the smartass many of you will feel I am, questions like this puzzle me. I consider any plans I may draw out, full size, as is - regardless of how large, or small, they are. Unless you're selling, or planning on selling, plans - but you didn't say that.
JOAT What is life without challenge and a constant stream of new humiliations? - Peter Egan
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(Frank Drackman) doth query: Does anyone print full size drawings of their plans? <snip>
Who needs plans? My questions are: What do you mean by 'full size drawings'? And, do you mean 'your' plans, that you drew; or plans made by someone else, that you bought? If you already have plans, why would you feel the need to print them? Or, do you mean print them the actual size of the finished product?
My guess is he mean full scale. That way, you can use them as templates. I once built a two story house from full scale plans. Worked out OK except I didn't realize the paper was curled. The roof leaked because of the way I made it curve to follow the plans. I probably should have joined the two halves of the house with nails instead of the Scotch tape like the plans had.
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"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote

Being a stickler for detail like you are, where did you find blue tuba4's?
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 8/08/07
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Had them special cut from blue spruce, of course.
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mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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As I was hitting "send", I thought that I SHOULD have included either a cymbal or rim shot.. lol
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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(Frank Drackman) doth query: Does anyone print full size drawings of their plans? <snip>
Who needs plans? My questions are: What do you mean by 'full size drawings'? And, do you mean 'your' plans, that you drew; or plans made by someone else, that you bought? If you already have plans, why would you feel the need to print them? Or, do you mean print them the actual size of the finished product?
Not being the smartass many of you will feel I am, questions like this puzzle me. I consider any plans I may draw out, full size, as is - regardless of how large, or small, they are. Unless you're selling, or planning on selling, plans - but you didn't say that.
I draw all of my own stuff. I start with a pencil and paper to flush out the general shapes and sizes. If I think that I might make additional pieces later I will usually redraw it using a 2D CAD system so that it can be easily modified.
There are many different reasons to print on material larger than the letter, or legal, sizes that fit into my printers. The reason for this job might seem silly to most people, but the client asked me to. I guess that they want to show friends/family that it is truly a custom piece and they want something bigger that 8.5" x 11".
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Sat, Sep 29, 2007, 12:23pm (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (FrankDrackman) doth sayeth: <snip> The reason for this job might seem silly to most people, but theclient asked me to. <snip>
Well, if you're making a living at it, that's a very valid reason for doing it. Answers my questions.
Hmm, if any of you guys want to make LARGE enlargements, I recall reading about a guy doing just that. Takes a B&W picture of whatever. Lays out a square (20 or 30' or so) of photographic papers on a floor. Then projects the negative on it. Develops the picture(s), puts them together in one large picture. Believe it took him some tries before he was able to get the pictures in focus, being as the projector was so far from the paper. It's a bit more complicated than that, but that's the basics.
JOAT What is life without challenge and a constant stream of new humiliations? - Peter Egan
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What Zip COde?
Find out where the builders and architects go to have their plans printed. We have a place in town called repro something. Real nice pricing and great quality.
Let your fingers do the walking.
Bob AZ
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They yellow pages. Almost any print shop should be able to print it out. Some times a little neighborhood shop is cheaper than a name store.
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Blueprint places can usually do large sheet copying.
Max
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I use an HP 36" plotter. Acquired from a company I worked for that went bankrupt, and had me get rid of millions of dollars of equipment by throwing it in a dumpster. Don's ask who they were, but a very reputable company.
I was able to save 2 items, a large format 24" color laser printer and the 36" plotter. Both came with enough supplies to last me 3 years!
I print full size plans only when model making as I can glue the drawing onto the wood and cut to the lines, it works really well with cog wheels and smaller parts.
Jon

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Sat, Sep 29, 2007, 3:04pm (EDT-1) snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (Jon) doth sayeth: <snip> I print full size plans only when model making as I can glue thedrawing onto the wood and cut to the lines, it works really well with cog wheels and smaller parts.
Been awhile since I've done it, so almost forgot. At times I make things with full size patterns glued on to the wood. The way I do it is print the pattern in sections, usually 3 to 5 sheets, depending on the project, on a standard Xero machine. Trim them down, carefully align them, glue down. Some are going on 4 foot long. For what I do, works very well indeed - and have to travel no further than the nearest copy machine. I'd tell you all the fine details, but I don't want to.
JOAT What is life without challenge and a constant stream of new humiliations? - Peter Egan
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J T wrote:

print a large drawing tiled across as many standard sheets of paper you want. It will print registration marks to make the alignment easy to do. I have used this method occasionally to make patterns for the bandsaw. Usually I find a 1 to 1 print to be accurate enough for most of my uses. However the scale is totally adjustable in both x and y so it would be simplt to make a test print, measure and correct scale. John
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Sun, Sep 30, 2007, 12:51am (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@worldnet.att.net (JohnSiegel) doth sayeth: The simple CAD program I have had around for years (AutoSketch) will print a large drawing tiled across as many standard sheets of paper you want. It will print registration marks to make the alignment easy to do. I have used this method occasionally to make patterns for the bandsaw. Usually I find a 1 to 1 print to be accurate enough for most of my uses. However the scale is totally adjustable in both x and y so it would be simplt to make a test print, measure and correct scale. John
I don't have a CAD program, I don't need one for income, so just another expensive toy I don't need. Instead I use a Xerox to "scale" my pattern up or down. I take a ruler, and have an idea of what % up or down to go. Start there, measure, go up or down as needed, remeasure. Usually right on within about 4 copies, so make all copies I want. AND write down the setting on the master, so I don't have to do it again next time. Inexpensive, works.
JOAT "I'm an Igor, thur. We don't athk quethtionth." "Really? Why not?" "I don't know, thur. I didn't athk."
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Frank Drackman wrote:

Kinko's can do it. You take 'em a diskette, they print the sucker.
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One word------Kinkos !!

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Kinko's is fine. They have a printer plug in that converts your file to Kinko's version of a PDF and sends your file to whatever Kinko's you want for printing. If you don't print all that much it's a good way to go.
R
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Local colleges with architecture departments probably still use pen plotters capable of D sized sheets or larger.
That said, I stopped using AutoCAD years ago. Butcher paper and #2 pencil inspire creativity better and will never go obsolete.
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