Printing Full Size Drawings

Page 1 of 3  
Does anyone print full size drawings of their plans? I have developed most of my recent final drawings with CAD programs but don't have a large format printer.
I was thinking on visiting the nearest Kinko's to see what they have to offer for large printers.
Are there other places I should look?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Kinkos wouldn't be a bad bet. Just up the street from my house is a place that does a lot of blueprint services, among other things. They also print drawings from a number of formats. They can even print on vellum or mylar if that would be helpful. You might also try looking for a place like that.
todd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

the generic name for such shops, and the yellow pages directory heading, is "reprographics shops".
Note: the _easy_ way to get big output is to get a PostScript printer, output full-size postscript from the CAD, package and send that througha 'posterizer' routine that will tile as many 8-1/2 x 11 sheets as needed to make the full drawing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Using an old dot matrix printer and fan-fold paper, I can make full size patterns of portions of a CAD drawings. Suits my purposes
Gary

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I recently bought a HP 9800. Had a buddy cut me a stack of 13 x 19 vellum paper (From 28 x 20). That makes for a SuperB size print. Plenty big enough for shop use and making notations. I paid under $ 300.00 (Can$) for the printer. (It also does nice posters.)
Anything, .dxf or .dwg I get from architects is all on CD or via e- Mail and revisions are also handled that way. The odd time I need a bigger drawing, most blue-print houses can handle .dxf and .dwg.
How big do you need to go?
r
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I print out all the individual sheets and then tape them together. It isn't perfect but works. As well, you can then take the taped up sheets into a blueprint shop and they can run you a full size. Just another option. Cheers, cc

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Frank Drackman wrote:

Kinkos should be able to print E-size or roll size. If you need larger than that you're outside the realm of "plans" and into the realm of "lofting".
There's no real benefit to doing so however unless the drawing is so complex that it becomes unreadable in smaller sizes. If you're thinking of using the drawing as a pattern, don't unless you're absolutely certain of the calibration of the printer.
--
--
--John
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This is probably a dumb question, but if they were full size plans, which I assume would be used for cutting out the parts, would calibration matter?
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, but all plotters should be calibrated anyway. I have couple of size E plotters (36" wide paper by any reasonable length - maybe up to 20' long or so) and I could tell you once the plotter is calibrated (one time calibration for all future plots) its more accurate than my wood working skills.
Anyway you should work off the dimensions on the blue lines (or black lines) and not scale it off from the drawings. But for woodworking it doesn't matter all that much assuming the drawing is to the right scale off the plotter.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
** Frank ** wrote:

Should be, but don't believe it unless you've tested it yourself or have the word of someone whose expertise you trust. And a production printer in a copy place I suspect that the utilization is high enough for wear and repairs to be an issue.

--
--
--John
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"mac davis" wrote

Pretty amazing how accurate even a run-of-the-mill ink jet printer is for doing 1":1" scale drawings from a CAD/drafting program.
I print 1:1 scale drawings of parts, like corbels, curved chair back rails, and most any thing with a curve to it that will fit on legal size (8 1/2 x 14") paper, paste the printed copies on both the router pattern material and the project stock with Elmer's Glue, then rough cut the shapes on the band saw.
You can still see the HP Ink Jet printed scale drawing pasted to the chair back router pattern in the following picture:
http://www.e-woodshop.net/images/MissionChairCrestJig0.JPG
The dimensions are precise and the parts come out like they were cut with a cookie cutter.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 8/08/07
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Wet paper stretches. Try solvent-based spray glue. A light, dusting coat will hold fine.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Ferd Farkel" wrote

Actually, that's what the Elmer's "glue" that I use is ... "Elmer's Spray Adhesive".
Thanks for pointing that out.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 8/8/07
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sun, Sep 30, 2007, 11:21am (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (FerdFarkel) doth sayeth: Wet paper stretches. Try solvent-based spray glue. A light, dusting coat will hold fine.
Not a problem with what i do. I use Titebond II thinned half and half. Position the pattern on the wood, lift one edge, brush on the thinned glue, use the same brush to brush the paper smooth on the glue, lift the unglued half, repeat. Then brush on some more thinned glue over the top, taking care to brush out any air bubbles. Let it dry overnight, then cut it out when ready. Of course, if you don't want the paper to stay on the wood, this would probably be a major PITA to get it off, unless you planed it off, or were willing to spend the time sanding. There are only one or two type of projects I do this with (no, no pukey ducks, at least not yet), including labels. You can make some nifty, and intricate, hand-colored labels, IF you color them before you glue, it's not as easy after..
JOAT "I'm an Igor, thur. We don't athk quethtionth." "Really? Why not?" "I don't know, thur. I didn't athk."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sep 30, 3:53 pm, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

Some luthiers use Knox gelatin to glue labels inside their guitars.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mac davis wrote:

Yes. Most printers don't have the same error horizontally that they do vertically and the amount of error is not constant across the page, so not only the dimensions but the proportions change.
The amount of error may or may not matter for a given project, but you need to find out how much error there is before you can decide that. It's not all that hard to figure out--just make a drawing of a grid of half-inch squares, print it, then confirm that the lines are straight, the corners are square, and the squares alone one side and along the top or bottom are indeed all the same width within your allowable error tolerance. If they are you're good to go.
If you're using Kinkos or the like though, you should do this each time you print because you don't know whether they might have done something that changed the calibration.

--
--
--John
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

certain of the calibration of the printer.

Not surprisingly, paper like wood, expands and contracts with changes in moisture content. Since paper is thinner than your typical board, these changes can happen in minutes. I have seen errors in drawings over 3/16ths of an inch across a 36 inch piece of paper. If you are concerned about the calibration of the printer then you probably also need to be concerned about the media that you are drawing upon.
I worked for 13 years for a company called CalComp that first made pen plotters and then large format electrostatic and inkjet printers. I did software development including the software for the positioning servos and calibration handling for several of CalComp's products.
The pen plotters had the ability to be calibrated in both the x and y axis. This was done as part of the final stage of manufacturing. The specified accuracy and repeatability was 0.005 inch for any position on an E size (or A0 size) piece of media. The limiting factors for accuracy were primarily friction effects and the fact that paper is not a perfectly stiff media.
The electrostatic and inkjets only had a calibration for the media travel path. The other axis was fixed by the manufacture of the print head on the electrostatics or a linear encoder on the ink jets. The accuracy for the media travel path was also 0.005 inch over a 44 inch E size piece of media. (I do not remember the accuracy specification for the other axis. It has been over 9 years.)
As I said earlier, paper like wood, is subject to expansion and contraction with changes in moisture content. CalComp always specified accuracy with a mylar (instead of paper) media to avoid expansion issues.
Since paper is so much thinner than the typical board, the size can change in only a few minutes when the paper's environment is changed. For best accuracy paper needed to taken out of its package or off of its roll and allowed to stabilized for 15 to 30 minutes before it is used. This is NOT going to happen at your local Kinko's.
We had a drawing on one wall of our lab that was a 12 feet long of a locomotive. This was drawn on a pen plotter that would do the image in multiple sections. It would pull off 44 inches of paper off the roll and then draw one section. It would then pull off another 44 inches and draw the next section. This plotter had a user selectable time delay to allow the media to stabilize before drawing the next section. Lines that crossed section boundaries were a very sensitive indicator of alignment and accuracy issues. The locomotive was drawn with no time delay between sections. As a result, the paper was changing as the drawing was being made. Lines at the section boundaries that were drawn at the start of a section would align with their mates in the previous section. Lines that were drawn later in a section had errors as large as 3/16ths of an inch.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan Coby wrote:

A very good point.

Kind of test that you can't really do with a raster plotter. I can see where that would be useful. Now I find myself wondering if Kinkos can print on film.
--
--
--John
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lines that were drawn later in a section had errors as large as

How about using mylar? Interesting, could be the rollers not tracking right and not the paper itself.
When I had my size E, 8 pen CalComp, it will track right on (replot on same print using the sight glass pen) with error within one #000 pen width with paper, vellum or mylar anywhere within the 36" x 48" sheet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This case was definitely with the paper. We (CalComp) did spend a lot of time with tracking issues (see next comment) but that was not the problem is this case. The problem was due to changes in the media. The paper had come off of a roll that had been stored in plastic wrapper, and it was acclimitizing to the room environment. One of my responsibilities was the software that was handling the alignment between sections. Thus I spent quite a bit of time making sure that the causes of the problems with this plot were known. This sort of problem did not occur with mylar which is dimensionally very stable.

Yes. CalComp spent a lot of effort in making sure that the media tracked accurately. While I was with CalComp, we built test fixtures for testing every new design for the pinch rollers, drums, and the platens. Sizes, shapes, materials, textures, forces, and alignment were all critical for proper tracking.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.