Priming MDF.

Somebody suggested to me that B-I-N was good for priming MDF.
Anybody have any experience with this or wish to make a recommendation ?
Thanks.
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It's awesome for MDF. It dries hard and sands very well. Plain old Seal Coat also works well, but I give the nod to BIN for the white pigment. I've also tried auto body primer, glue size, drywall compound, and others. I always seem to go back to BIN or Seal Coat.
FWIW, we've gone around on the 'wreck a few times on what BIN is. The latest cans I've purchased have "Shellac Base" in yellow, right on the front of the can.
Does Zinnser lurk? <G>
Barry
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I've always understood BIN to be a 4 pound cut shellac with a hefty amount of white pigment added. Probably has a few other minor ingredients as well.
Ian
wrote:

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I want to attempt a piano style finish on MDF with BIN then some Flecto Varathane Liquid Plastic. Anyone do this before ?
Sean.
Ba r r y wrote:

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No, but I've done it with BIN and lacquer.
Lacquers really rub out to a killer gloss.
Barry
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What process do you go through for that ? Something Ive never done. Is it durable ?
Ba r r y wrote:

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It's plenty durable. High-end furniture, musical instruments, like pianos and custom guitars, and custom cars are finished with Nitrocellulose lacquer.
It involves, priming & filling, wet sanding, color coats, and clear coats. Dewaxed shellac, like Zinnser Seal Coat, works great as a barrier coat between products. The final coats are rubbed out to a wet-like shine with automotive polishing compounds. This process isn't difficult, but it is time consuming.
Lacquer dries hard, so it rubs out well. Liquid plastics and polyurethanes build quickly, but stay soft for a long time.
<http://groups.google.com/groups?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF-8&q=high+gloss+lacquer+finish
Try some test boards, write your steps on the back for troubleshooting or success duplication, and have at it!
Barry
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I'll agree with your conclusion, but not how you got there. Lacquer also requires time to cure, especially to rub to a very high sheen. Poly may take a little longer, or much longer depending on the type. In any case, they are both very hard. Lacquer (or shellac, also), however, will fracture much sharper than most any poly, and will give you a higher sheen with less work. GerryG
On Mon, 20 Sep 2004 10:35:36 GMT, Ba r r y

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GerryG wrote:

"Polyurethane" covers a wide range of compositions--some are quite soft, some are quite hard.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
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Sorry to be ignorant, but what is MDF short for?

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no sweat = only way to learn is to ask
medium density fiberboard

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Exposed core of MDF can sure suck up paint.
I happened to have a can of latex galvanized steel primer out for a different project. What the heck, tried it on a small project. Brush primed the edges. Sprayed project with rattle can paint - great.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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