Pretend you know an idiot...

... and this purely hypothetical idiot asks you for advice with the following problem:
He (hypothetically, of course) puts some pencil marks on the wrong edge of a face frame, the outside edge. He realizes his mistake and redoes the marks in the proper place, intending to sand off the ones he made in error. For the sake of argument, let's suppose he forgets to do so, partly because he thought that edge would butt up against another unit and partly due to general absent-mindedness.
Our fictional novice woodworker then proceeds to finish over the marks, only discovering that they will indeed be on an exposed side as he applying the tenth clamp to glue the face frame to the box. He does not take the whole works apart at this point.
So, were such an improbably boneheaded error to actually happen, how would you advise him to fix it? I imagine he would first think to sand it with some pretty coarse sandpaper to get through the poly and pencil, then smooth and refinish. But that sounds pretty laborious. I wonder if he could shave off the tiniest amount with a router (our hypothetical face frame is maybe 3/32" proud of the cabinet edge) and straight-edge.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Greg Guarino" wrote in message

I'd use a card scraper if I ever made a mistake like that... The poly and pencil marks would come off quickly without altering the dimensions...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, April 28, 2013 5:26:13 PM UTC-5, John Grossbohlin wrote:

a mistake like that...
I've made that mistake, before, in a tight spot, hard to conveniently get t o. Rather than a card/cabinet scraper, I used the sharp slightly curved ed ge of my Buckknife, but any sharp slightly curved stout bladed knife will d o. I've done somewhat delicate paint scrapings with this technique and hav e scraped sprayed lacquer runs/bad drips in tight/small places, also. It's a modified card/cabinet scraping technique.... modified for small, tight p laces.
The curved edge allows for site/spot specific scraping.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Concur. That would be my first choice as well.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
AW come on Greg. I know you would never do that. WW
"Greg Guarino" wrote in message
... and this purely hypothetical idiot asks you for advice with the following problem:
He (hypothetically, of course) puts some pencil marks on the wrong edge of a face frame, the outside edge. He realizes his mistake and redoes the marks in the proper place, intending to sand off the ones he made in error. For the sake of argument, let's suppose he forgets to do so, partly because he thought that edge would butt up against another unit and partly due to general absent-mindedness.
Our fictional novice woodworker then proceeds to finish over the marks, only discovering that they will indeed be on an exposed side as he applying the tenth clamp to glue the face frame to the box. He does not take the whole works apart at this point.
So, were such an improbably boneheaded error to actually happen, how would you advise him to fix it? I imagine he would first think to sand it with some pretty coarse sandpaper to get through the poly and pencil, then smooth and refinish. But that sounds pretty laborious. I wonder if he could shave off the tiniest amount with a router (our hypothetical face frame is maybe 3/32" proud of the cabinet edge) and straight-edge.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This is entirely right pondian thinking. A well-fettled smoothing plane would do the job in seconds, if you can get one in there. JG refers to a card scraper. I imagine this is what I would call a cabinet scraper. Bit of hardened steel with a burr formed along the edge(s). Great tools but (1) never to be used on softwood and (2) pita to reshape the burr unless you use them frequently. I think the use of a router would be overkill. That makes me wonder about something, but I'll put my wanderings in another post. Good luck, Nick.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Nick" wrote in message

Yup... aka cabinet scraper. RE softwoods, I use them on woods like pine all the time. If well prepared they do a wonderful job on pine and fir. I often use one as an eraser as I do layouts and such as they work far better than a real eraser. I think the "conventional" wisdom is due to dull scrapers not working...
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I (uh, he) considered this idea but worries that his skills with a plane are still in their infancy. The edge in question is almost five feet long. I assume he would need to take down the whole length the same amount even though the pencil marks are confined to three small areas, correct?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Greg Guarino wrote:

Incorrect. Use a scraper.
Once through the varnish, alcohol should remove the pencir; or an eraser; or sandpaper; or even the scraper.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/28/2013 3:21 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

:-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A perfect place to sign your work? - - - - So, were such an improbably boneheaded error to actually happen, how would you advise him to fix it? I imagine he would first think to sand it with some pretty coarse sandpaper..clip
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.