Presealer for cherry?

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Hi, I'm teaching myself the proper conditioning procedures for cherry and I need to preseal it. Can anyone recommend a brand of presealer for the cherry? Thanks.
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Don't need it.
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On Tue, 26 Jul 2011 16:17:59 -0700 (PDT), Robatoy

Hmmm. The text I'm reading suggests that cherry has a tendency to blotch and a presealer can help to reduce or eliminate that tendency. Guess I have some more reading to do.
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Blotch? You mean when st..sta..stai...*shudder* STAINING?
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On 7/26/11 6:32 PM, Robatoy wrote:

If you're staining, save yourself a lot of money and just use any clear hardwood, like beech, birch or maple.
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-MIKE-

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wrote:

Come on Robatoy. He may not be actually staining it. Give him a little credit. He may be PAINTING it. That would cover up that ugly cherry color.
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On Tue, 26 Jul 2011 16:32:22 -0700 (PDT), Robatoy

Actually, I was under the impression that even a clear finish could soak into some areas a little more than others and leave a darker haze. As you can see, while I consider my woodworking skills to be adequate, my dislike and lack of knowledge when it comes to finishing, occasionally leaves the final result something to be desired.
Besides, like Mike said, I may want to paint my cherry and I want a smooth paint coat without any streaking. <g>
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I've always understood to apply BLO or tung oil, to enhance the grain, then topcoat with clear finish. Thin the BLO or tung oil with paint thinner or naptha, to help with penetration. The oil will prevent blotching... or certainly reduce it significantly.
Sonny
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On 7/27/2011 4:27 AM, Dave wrote:

A web site is worth a thousand words. DJM is known for his natural finishes on woods like cherry and he uses both a sealer and top coat:
http://www.djmarks.com/stories/faq/what_is_the_mix_ratio_for_the_linseed_oil_tung_oil_and_urethane_46687.asp
I have also gotten beautiful finishes with cherry by using a Sam Maloof finish, which is an oil/poly base, followed by coats of oil/poly/wax base:
http://www.e-woodshop.net/images/HC24.jpg
This hope chest, done with Sam Maloof finish, is even more beautiful today, with that rich, natural cherry color that only comes for exposure to sunlight.
The Sam Maloof product can be had from Rockler or WoodCraft ... it is my first choice for cherry, although either method works a treat.
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Thanks Karl. This is the type of information I was looking for.
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On 7/27/2011 8:22 AM, Swingman wrote:

Meant to add that, with the Maloof finish, a sealer is not necessary at all, and probably best to not use one with that particular method.
Both methods take the same application technique and take about the same time.
With the oil/poly, some future maintenance may be necessary, IOW, repeat final oil/poly/wax coat using that old saw" "Once a week for a month, once a month for a year, once a year thereafter." ... although I don't usually bother unless it is really dry and in direct sunlight.
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The Maloof finish is very nice. I might add that there are locally available, but less effective alternatives. There are a variety of wiping varnishes available from a lot of home and hardware stores. They are very easy to apply and with some light rubbing, provide a nice finish.
While many here do not support Min Wax products, I have had good luck with their wipe-on-poly. I have used it on a lot of hardwood rocking horse projects and usually top with a coat of wax. The horses take some use and abuse but a light coat of wax, ever year or two, brings the appearance back.
RonB
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That old saw is for BLO alone, not that farkin' poly chit. When're you going to try a _real_ finish, Swingy? http://www.waterlox.com /
-- Live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air -- Ralph Waldo Emerson
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On 7/27/2011 9:08 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Although I've used Waterlox in the past, C-Less, anyone who takes a look at the cherry hope chest today would not venture to add that Waterlox would have done a better job, trust me on that. :)
As for the "old saw" meant for BLO only, it works for the oil/poly/wax coat as well, guaranteed.
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Do you de-wax first, each time? Or is there a solvent in the mix?
-- Live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air -- Ralph Waldo Emerson
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On 7/27/2011 11:45 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Sorry, I misspoke (but I'm not going to resign my seat in deficit financing practice) ... the final, and any subsequent, coats are an oil/wax, and forego the poly.
And I knew that ... go figure.
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The penalty is one Festool sent to me. Got my address? I believe the bestest starter tool would be a 55 or 75, OK?
-- Win first, Fight later.
--martial principle of the Samurai
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On Wed, 27 Jul 2011 13:46:54 -0700, Larry Jaques

I'd send you my TS55, but I returned it for an HL50-e. Sorry.
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OK. The 75 will have to do, then. I already have a nice hand electric planer. http://goo.gl/X7UVA as well as a stable of Knight and Satanley planes.
-- Win first, Fight later.
--martial principle of the Samurai
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That'd be guwahrahnteed. n'est pas?
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