predrilling for a #2 screw

Page 1 of 2  
I am building some small (5"x8") gift boxes out of small scraps in the shop. Some of the boxes have hinged tops and I am using some small brass hinges from LV -- the hinged use a #2 brass wood screw.
The latest box I am trying to finish is made from Honduran Rosewood -- a beautiful, but very dense wood. I am predrilling holes for the #2 screws using a 1/16" bit to the depth of the screw which worked fine in the Mahogany I was working with earlier. The Rosewood, however is a bit more fickle and I continue to snap the heads of the screws.
Anybody know any tricks to make this work ? I know about using a steel screw first to define the whole but I do not have any #2 steel screws handy..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The trick is to use a Steel #2 to make the initial threads in the predrilled hole and then put in the brass screw.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Using a steel screw to thread the holes first is a good idea. You can also use a lubricant on the brass ones. Beeswax preferably, but bar soap works in a pinch. --dave

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pre drill
Then use a #2 STEEL screw to cut the threads, then remove the steel #2 and put in the brass #2
If you don't have any #2 steel screws, maybe a run to the hardware store is in order???
John
On Tue, 4 Jan 2005 16:19:01 -0500, "Sam the Cat"

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sam the Cat wrote:

Have you tried applying some wax to the threads of the screws first?
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
sam_spam snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net says...

that a 5/64 bit is more appropriate. Should ease the situation a lot.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 4 Jan 2005 16:19:01 -0500, "Sam the Cat"

Why are you here? So wait until you can get some.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Use a steel -- oh! Sorry! :)
Seriously - I think you might need to try a 3/32nd's pilot.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Many many years ago in high school shop we were taught to take a drill bit and lay it along side the screw we wanted to pre-drill. When we could just see the bottoms of both 'V's over the thichness of the bit, we had the correct drill bit to pre-drill with. Don't know if thats a 1/16th in your case or not but its always worked for me.
Try some of the wax from a toilet bowl ring on the threads. Works great and one $1 ring will last years and years.
Grandpa John
Sam the Cat wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<< I know about using a steel screw first to define the whole but I do not have any #2 steel screws handy.. >>
Would a small machine screw tap possibly give enough relief for the wood screw?
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Probably not. Since the machine screw has a different thread form, turning a tap down the hole will attempt to cut the machine thread. When you attempt to follow this with the wood screw, it would be like attempting to thread a 10-24 screw into a 10-32 nut.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Work at your leisure!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ok -- for all those that recommend the "steel screw approach" -- got any ideas where to get a #2 (or #1 or #0) in steel ?
Borg stops at #4 -- the LV catalog stops at #4.......

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You can get #2 and much smaller here.
http://www.smallparts.com/products/descriptions/TX.cfm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
cool -- thanks

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
youre kidding me, 14.5cents for a small screw? even in stainless is ridiculous... were those 2.60 for the 3 ought?... wow... wouldnt wnat to drop those in a crack... if you used 3 or four of those in a hinge, it would be more than the hinge.. holy crap...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You should send you response to the internet site. Seems reasonable to me. Try finding them cheaper.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

www.mcmaster.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sam the Cat wrote:

McFeely's stops at #4 too, looks like.
So I'd try:
* use a slightly bigger drill bit * lubricate the threads with Johnson's paste wax; drive while still wet
How big is a #2 screw anyway? I haven't really learned screw sizes, since I usually just use the screws that come with my crap BORG hardware.
What I'm thinking is, might you not find a suitable screw in some little toy, or a computer? I can think of lots of little steel screws I've seen along the way, though I'd guess it's probably unlikely any of them have the right thread pitch for wood.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
MSCDirect.com and McMaster-Carr both list #2 steel woodscrews
John
On Wed, 05 Jan 2005 11:27:07 -0500, Silvan

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.